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Thursday Plantation – The Original Australian Tea Tree Chewing Sticks (Toothpicks) Cinnamon Flavor – 100 Stick(s)

Buy from:  Amazon         LuckyVitamin
41E4DGFJJJL._SY355_Thursday Plantation The Original Australian Tea Tree Chewing Sticks (Toothpicks) deliver therapeutic grade Melaleuca alternifolia oil between teeth and at the gum line. Thursday Plantation The Original Australian Tea Tree Toothpicks help remove debris and plaque in placesThursday Plantation The Original Australian Tea Tree Chewing Stick (Toothpick) is infused with a powerful array of natural plant extracts, including peppermint, spearmint, cinnamon, fennel and menthol.

Thursday Plantation The Original Australian Tea Tree Chewing Sticks help reduce bad breath and support oral hygiene by eliminating odour causing bacteria that can lodge between teeth after eating.

Features and Benefits:

Contains 100% pure Tea Tree Oil, an antibacterial agent
Suitable for use to assist smoking cessation by keeping hands busy
Powerful, fresh flavor
Handy pocket-size pack

 Testimonials on Amazon:
If you are in the process of quitting smoking, BUY THESE. Chew on them in the car, outside with people on their smoke breaks, at the bar, etc. They taste so good and make your breath smell great, and toothpicks are so much classier than cigarettes! The cinnamon ones are veeeerrry strong, so if you aren’t a big cinnamon fan, stay away. The mint and tea tree are strong enough on their own.

I have tried a number of brands of Tea Tree Oil chewing sticks and these are the best! They are very strong, so it may take a little getting used to, but the mix of oils in these gives the best flavor and the wood they use is the highest quality.

Now, I always carry a pack with me. They are great for after meals or simply to freshen your breath throughout the day.
I’m not a person who smokes however these are very high quality chew sticks. Made of birch they don’t shred as easy for the avid chewer. Regular toothpicks are no longer the same to me because these def. raise the standard. I want to note that the taste of these picks is pretty strong especially for the non-smoker (like me) but I like these all the same.

Note that I’m cavity prone! However after chewing and picking my teeth with these 3 times a day, 2 weeks before i went to the dentist…my dentist informed me that I had the cleanest mouth he had ever seen. And no cavities.
Note that I have been Cold free for about 2 and a half years.
Note that I gave one of these to my friends at work who had a mouthsore and he claims it numbed the pain away.

Ever since I was introduced to Thursday Plantation – Tea Tree Toothpicks I carry them with me all the time. They keep my teeth clean after meals and they get rid of bad breath. There are other brands out there but don’t be fooled. Thursday Plantation – Tea Tree Toothpicks are the best on the market.

I was given this product by a client of mine whom I told I was planning on quitting smoking. I decided to have nicotine gum on standby because was a pretty heavy smoker (1pk/day). Well, hesitant to chew the gum and feed my body the drug I am trying to kick, I turned to these chewing sticks. Every slightest urge to smoke, I pop one of these bad boys in my mouth and suck and chew on it for 10 minutes. The minute it hits my mouth, I forget my cigarette craving. Plus, my breath smells great, and I always have that just went-to-the dentist clean mouth feeling. This is the easiest time I have ever had stopping smoking.

There are SO many imposters but they all fail to achieve the kick that these pics pack when you pop one in your mouth. And for the brave at heart, I suggest chewing on them after they get a little soft. The effect is sinus-clearing! I love thursday plantation chewing sticks and will accept no substitutes and believe me, I have tried them all.

Excellent product. The sticks are sturdy and the flavor is distinct but not overpowering. Great not only as a smoking cessation aid but as regular toothpicks.

Please note that when shipped as part of a larger order, the plastic containers can bounce around in the box and open, spilling the sticks all over. It’s best to order separately from large items, in which case they’ll ship in a padded envelope rather than a big box and won’t have this problem.

The very-easy-opening containers might also pose a problem for someone trying to carry them around in a pants pocket.

I quit smoking 6 months ago with chantix and these toothpicks. I quit the Chantix a couple months in but have been using the toothpicks ever since. Also have been getting nausea a lot lately. After looking into lots of different ideas, I googled tea tree oil…..every site warns you not to take internally. It can be highly toxic even in small doses. So while it did help quitting smoking, I’m switching over to the minty toothpicks you get in restaurants.


Auromere Ayurvedic Neem Picks 100 Toothpicks Case of 12
$_57

Buy from:   ebay.com

Ayurvedic toothpicks made from birchwood dipped in Neem Bark extract and other potent essential oils to stimulate the gums, remove food particles and plaque between teeth, and freshen the breath.

Pack Size : 100 Toothpicks
Unit Type : Case

Ingredients:
Birchwood toothpicks flavored with Neem Bark extract, Cassia (cinnamon) Oil, Menthol, Peppermint Oil, Spearmint Oil, and Fennel Oil.

 


A few points from India, where this method is still used, though not as widely as it was 30 years ago. (1) Were the sticks really very dry? Here, we use young twigs off the plants because they are easiest to chew. they’re a bit more slender than what you seem to have there. Also because you don’t mention the taste, which should have been quite a notable thing had you had young, fresh sap in the twigs (2) No, it’s not something used centuries ago. It’s in use in living memory, though — like I was saying, rarer than 30 years ago, when it seemed ubiquitous in my child’s eyes. Lots of long-lived people around here with all their teeth — can’t recall more than two of my 15-odd grandparents, great-grandparents and great-uncles and aunts having ever had caries of any sort (and no, dentist’s visits as prevention are STILL not the norm, so that’s not regular professional cleaning doing the trick). (3) I’m guessing the pregnancy warning is statutory for any herbal product that hasn’t expressly been studied for safety in pregnancy. Neem does nothing terrible to your hormones that regular food doesn’t (there are enough phytoestrogens in food even without soy coming into the picture; there are other foods that cause migraines, relieve aches and whatnot… all food has ‘side effects’, if you look really hard for them). In India, or at least the eastern part of the country, we eat neem leaves all the time as a delicacy. No one stops using neem twigs or eating the leaves because they are pregnant. (And it’s not our of ignorance — there ARE proscribed foods, such as raw poppy seed paste.) We do stop when breastfeeding, but only because some children (supertasters, i guess) can taste the difference in mother’s milk. (4) It shouldn’t take very long to brush with these — in fact, we try to peel the bark with the front teeth, then actively chew on the end to soften it and use alternate sides to do that, because the very act of chewing cleans the teeth for the most part. After that, a quick once-over. But yeah, nowhere near as fast as toothpaste… though like someone’s already said, the idea isn’t to do this at ‘brushing time’. We do it between tasks or while doing other stuff — on your morning walk, while walking the dog, reading the paper, watching an after-dinner movie, waiting for the bath to fill are all good ideas! – See more at: http://myplasticfreelife.com/2011/06/verdict-on-neem-chew-stick-toothbrushes/#sthash.THS1Dkh6.dpuf
A few points from India, where this method is still used, though not as widely as it was 30 years ago. (1) Were the sticks really very dry? Here, we use young twigs off the plants because they are easiest to chew. they’re a bit more slender than what you seem to have there. Also because you don’t mention the taste, which should have been quite a notable thing had you had young, fresh sap in the twigs (2) No, it’s not something used centuries ago. It’s in use in living memory, though — like I was saying, rarer than 30 years ago, when it seemed ubiquitous in my child’s eyes. Lots of long-lived people around here with all their teeth — can’t recall more than two of my 15-odd grandparents, great-grandparents and great-uncles and aunts having ever had caries of any sort (and no, dentist’s visits as prevention are STILL not the norm, so that’s not regular professional cleaning doing the trick). (3) I’m guessing the pregnancy warning is statutory for any herbal product that hasn’t expressly been studied for safety in pregnancy. Neem does nothing terrible to your hormones that regular food doesn’t (there are enough phytoestrogens in food even without soy coming into the picture; there are other foods that cause migraines, relieve aches and whatnot… all food has ‘side effects’, if you look really hard for them). In India, or at least the eastern part of the country, we eat neem leaves all the time as a delicacy. No one stops using neem twigs or eating the leaves because they are pregnant. (And it’s not our of ignorance — there ARE proscribed foods, such as raw poppy seed paste.) We do stop when breastfeeding, but only because some children (supertasters, i guess) can taste the difference in mother’s milk. (4) It shouldn’t take very long to brush with these — in fact, we try to peel the bark with the front teeth, then actively chew on the end to soften it and use alternate sides to do that, because the very act of chewing cleans the teeth for the most part. After that, a quick once-over. But yeah, nowhere near as fast as toothpaste… though like someone’s already said, the idea isn’t to do this at ‘brushing time’. We do it between tasks or while doing other stuff — on your morning walk, while walking the dog, reading the paper, watching an after-dinner movie, waiting for the bath to fill are all good ideas! – See more at: http://myplasticfreelife.com/2011/06/verdict-on-neem-chew-stick-toothbrushes/#sthash.THS1Dkh6.dpuf
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