Category Archives: products

Swak – the vegan toothbrush has arrived –

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Combining the brilliance of tree sticks with contemporary eco handle design – the dawn of a new era = fancy MISWAK toothbrush    SWAK from Germany

How to SWAK
Plaque is removed thoroughly and gently, even in places a conventional toothbrush can’t reach. Plaque removal with a conventional brush often causes damage to teeth and gums which doesn’t happen with SWAK.

How?

When brushing your teeth with the SWAK toothbrush the moistened head is moved gently over the necks of your teeth. Thus plaque is gently removed from your teeth.

How often?
Once a day is more than enough; at the earliest it takes 24 hours before plaque bacteria produce acids which then start to attack the teeth.

How long?
You only need to clean until each tooth feels smooth; you can check with your tongue if there is still plaque on your teeth. Using the tip of your tongue you can check each individual tooth; plaque feels rough and furry, clean teeth feel smooth!

Where?

The SWAK toothbrush offers you the chance to brush your teeth whenever and wherever you want, even out of the house as you neither need water nor toothpaste. You’re no longer chained to the sink; the SWAK toothbrush is used flexibly in many situations: whilst watching television, or at the computer, in the car…actually anywhere and everywhere!

How to brush your teeth with SWAK
Teeth cleaning with the SWAK toothbrush is carried out using the “swing technique”. The bristle head is moved gently over each tooth’s surface close to the neck ensuring existing plaque bacteria colonies are removed (disorganised) and therefore rendered harmless: no toothpaste necessary!

Some Tips:
* To change the taste of the miswak wood, a drop of tooth oil can be dripped onto the SWAK head.
* Hard bristles can be softened by gently nibbling the tip.
Bristles that are too long can be moistened and then cut with regular scissors.
* 
Children can use the SWAK toothbrush on their own at the earliest at age 7.
* The SWAK Tooth Salt contains the health-promoting components of the miswak wood and works on healing on inflamed gums.
* Like with conventional toothbrushes the SWAK should not be kept in an airtight container.

Note:

As with conventional nylon toothbrushes the SWAK should not be kept in an airtight container. When used with the “swing technique” the SWAK bristle head is very durable. A replacement of the bristle head only becomes necessary when a decreased cleaning action is noticed when checking your teeth with your tongue.

 

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Your Favourite Eco Toothbrush: Partly Biodegradable, Partly Not

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see an older post about nylon 6 and nylon 4

although designers are doing the very best they can, there is still not a fully degradable bristle apart from the boar-bristle. if there are, can you tell us about it in the comments below?


home_groupthe brush we all know and love and buy by-the-box to give as gifts to our less enviro-aware family members   . . . . .

The Environmental Toothbrush

the honest designer & manufacter (manufactured in china under contract), a dentist from brisbane of “The Environmental Toothbrush” was horrified when he was informed that their bristles were not made from nylon 4 and he let his buyers know that he had been misled.

following is the amended text on his website . . . .

The bristles are made from a BPA FREE polymer resistant to microbial growth during normal use, to ensure safety and durability.  We have tried to find a biodegradable bristle but as of this time there is nothing available – apart from boars hair (don’t want to go there).  No they are not Nylon 4 (as far as we know there are no bristles made from Nylon 4 on the market today).

We have tried to bring you a toothbrush that is better for the environment- over the years we have been misled by our manufactures about our bristles being made of Nylon 4.  We still believe that our toothbrush is a better alternative to a full Plastic toothbrush.

from Beth Terry


designed-for-all-1280logo

 

 

from bogobrush website . . .

We believe the world deserves a toothbrush worth caring about. We believe that starts with knowing where it came from, and how it was made. We believe it grows from an attention to aesthetics that will make you smile, and deepens with the beauty of giving back to someone in need. We believe that what is good for the planet, is good for us. We believe in the little toothbrush that could.

What kind of bristles are in a Bogobrush? Are they soft? Bogobrushes use the highest quality Tynex Nylon bristles from Dupont.  They are a “soft” bristle, and are polished with ceramic by our bristling manufacturer for an extra smooth feel.

How long will it take to break down, (i.e. degrade)?

It depends.  Maybe a few months, maybe a few years.  With any compostable material, the time of degradation depends on the health of the compost pile – humidity, temperature, and bio-diversity, (bugs, microbes, plants, etc. –  as well as the size and surface area of the product).
What will it degrade into?

Bogobrush bio-composite handles will degrade into carbon dioxide, water, and humus, (a soil nutrient).

about-feature2

Hi Marion,
Thank you for reaching out to us.  This is a great question.  Several years ago, we learned from our U.S. manufacturing partners that Nylon 4 was not actually a viable bristle option, despite what Chinese manufacturing told us.  This was before we started actual production, so we pulled all language of the sort from our marketing materials.  There is likely some lingering information out on the internet from our pre-order launch in 2012, but we certainly no longer claim that material for our brush.  While we wish there were other bristle options, we feel good about our decision to provide high quality bristles to our customers.  Some day, we hope demand for eco-bristles will help spur viable options.
You can go to our website shop page and scroll to FAQ section to learn more about our bristles and how we recommend composting our biodegradable brush.
Please let us know if you have further questions.  We will be happy to help!
Best,
Heather McDougall
co-founder

302438_471113779573595_1091126901_n-240x231Brush With Bamboo

 

from Beth Terry at Life Without Plastic

 


Total Clean Eco Toothbrush

Features of the Animal Lovers Total Clean Eco Toothbrush
Animal Lovers Total Clean Eco Toothbrush

  • Designed in conjunction with dental advice.
  • Easy-grip ergonomic bamboo biodegradable handle has natural flexibility, absorbing brushing pressure and reducing gum irritation.
  • Zig zag bristles with rounded tips for gentle cleaning in-between teeth and along the delicate gum line.
  • 30mm tapered head is smaller than regular over-sized toothbrush heads for easy access to those hard-to-reach places.
  • Heat treatment carbonizes the bamboo surface for water resistance and prevention of microbe growth (bacteria and moulds) during normal use.
  • Attractive, individual packaging made from recycled card makes the toothbrushes a great gift or Christmas stocking stuffer.

 


preserve

PreserveTB2015-Colors

 

 

 

Preserve

Features:

  • Made with LOVE and recycled yogurt cups
  • Handle created with 100% recycled #5 plastic; bristles are new nylon
  • Easy-to-grip curved handle
  • Tiered bristles for gentle, thorough cleaning
  • Includes reusable travel case
  • Be sure to learn about our toothbrush recycling program listed below

 

on a completely different subject ….   homemade laundry cleaner

 

 

 

Non-nylon alternatives to Boar Bristle

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i have not yet found an alternative for TOOTH brushes. apart from not using a TOOTHBRUSH ever again instead i used my newly discovered ECO VEGAN toothstick.


i have used boar-bristle hairbrushes all my life.  i have used boar-bristle toothbrushes for about 29 years.  as a animal friender, for the last 3 years, i have been searching for evidence of  humanely-harvested boar bristle.  now that i am of the mind that even humanely-harvested hog bristle comes from animals who are still exploited because it is a commercial operation.  if i had a pet pig, and i gave it a scratch and an occasional haircut, i know that my pig would feel happy to be of service to my need for brushes. i do not have a pet pig.  i have at last found my alternatives – a stick for teeth and bamboo brush for hair.

NYLON has been a NO GO  for me, for a couple of decades or so:

  • nylon bristles ALWAYS scratch teeth enamel, and damage the hair, no exceptions.
  • nylon is made from petroleum

i have found some alternatives to nylon and commercially shaved or killed & shaved boar/badger etc :

BRISTLES

  • sisal
  • jute
  • tampico/agave/cactus

PINS

  • wood
  • bamboo
  • ceramic?

FORUMS talking about VEGAN ALTERNATIVE TO BOAR-BRISTLE


ABOUT BRISTLES

http://www.gordonbrush.com/material_descriptions.php


SISAL

http://www.amazon.com/Friendly-Wooden-Vegan-Sisal-Brush/dp/B00BRHN5IY


JUTE

body    –  http://www.bernardjensen.com/SKIN-BRUSH–NATURAL-TAMPICO-BRISTLES-WLONG-HANDLE_p_47.html


TAMPICO/agave/cactus BRISTLE: Tampico looks really stiff and scratchy for the body, is it?

hair  –    http://www.care2.com/greenliving/hairbrushes-easy-greening.html

body  –   http://www.biome.com.au/body-brushing/1519-natural-body-brush-tampico-plant-long-handle-for-body-brushing.html


WOOD & WOOD PINS

hair: comb  – https://www.widu.com/category/13./Wooden-Combs.html

hair: brush  –  https://www.widu.com/

hair  –  i have not yet checked the following links – if you have tried one of the following brushes, feel free to write a comment

http://livingprettynaturally.com/top-5-reasons-to-use-a-wooden-brush-lpns-fave-hair-brushes-and-comb/

https://www.google.com.au/search?q=wood+pin+hair+brush&source=univ&tbm=shop&tbo=u&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiS8tfdlYLMAhWhLaYKHWGPDmgQsxgIHA

http://chrischristensenaustralia.com.au/product-category/grooming-accessories/brushes/wood-pin-brushes/


BAMBOO PINS

hair  –  http://www.thebodyshop.com.au/haircare/brushes/hair-brush-with-bamboo-pins-large.aspx#.Vwkyn3CSRok


CERAMIC PINS

hair  –  https://translate.google.com.au/translate?sl=auto&tl=en&js=y&prev=_t&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.tek-italy.it%2F&edit-text=

hair – https://translate.googleusercontent.com/translate_c?depth=1&hl=en&ie=UTF8&prev=_t&rurl=translate.google.com.au&sl=auto&tl=en&u=https://www.facebook.com/Tekitaly&usg=ALkJrhiC_h4cHJvAiGFULo8L949TiE-89Q

Miswak

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Buy Miswak :  Natural Toothbrush  |   Amazon   |   Neem Tree Farm   |  Google   |   Miswakstick.com   |  The Islamic Bookstore  |  Ebay Facebook  |  Miswak Promo $2 instead of $20

Download:   Miswak: A cultural Heritage PDF

http://www.miswakstick.com/files/Miswak-Scientific-Benifits.pdf

Articles:  Results of Clinical Study – comparison of Miswak & Brushing      Natural Toothbrush Alternatives    Kill Periodontal symptoms at Home           Five Steps to Develop the Habit of Miswak

a wonderful article on discovering the joys of Miswak


From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

Traditional miswak sticks. Softened bristles on either end can be used to clean the teeth.

The miswak (miswaak, siwak, sewak, Arabic: سواك‎ or مسواك) is a teeth cleaning twig made from the Salvadora persica tree (known as arak in Arabic). A traditional and natural alternative to the modern toothbrush, it has a long, well-documented history and is reputed for its medicinal benefits. It is reputed to have been used over 7000 years ago. The miswak’s properties have been described thus: “Apart from their antibacterial activity which may help control the formation and activity of dental plaque, they can be used effectively as a natural toothbrush for teeth cleaning. Such sticks are effective, inexpensive, common, available, and contain many medical properties”. It also features prominently in Islamic hygienical jurisprudence.

The miswak is predominant in Muslim-inhabited areas. It is commonly used in the Arabian peninsula, the Horn of Africa, North Africa, parts of the Sahel, the Indian subcontinent, Central Asia and Southeast Asia. In Malaysia, miswak is known as Kayu Sugi (Malay for ‘chewing stick’).


WHAT TREES ARE MISWAK MADE FROM?

suitable wood for miswak come from various trees in different parts of the world for example:

Salvadora Persica (the toothbrush tree)    buy in oz   TOothbrush tree

source:   http://www.allthingsislam.com.au (this site is now closed)

Common Names: Salt bush, Mustard tree, The tooth brush tree.
Internationally known as: Arak, Siwak, Peelu, Miswak.
Scientific Name: Salvadora Persica

Potential Dental Benefits with Regular Use:

Research shows that the bark of the “Toothbrush Tree” contains on antibiotic which suppresses the growth of bacteria and the formation of plaque in the mouth. Research also suggests that the regular use of Miswak significantly reduces plaque, gingivitis, and the growth of cariogenic bacteria. No toothpaste required! Miswak, naturally contains many components such as fluoride, astringents, detergents, resins (a possible enamel protectant) and abrasives.

How to use:

Simply scrape off bark from the tip (1/2″), then chew the tip gently until brush like and the fiber becomes soft. Brush teeth horizontally and frequently. When the bristles are worn and the flavor has subsided, cut them off & repeat instruction.

Miswak is also spelled as Miswaak, Meswak, Miswaq or Meswaq. In Arabic, its also known as sewak. Some people prefer spelling it as sewak, siwak, siwaak and with such small variations.

 


Different Kind of Miswak … Peelu, Olive, Bitam Tree Miswak

source:  http://www.sewakalbadr.com/types-of-miswak.php

It is permissible to take for a Miswak all kinds of tree twigs provided these aren’t hazardous or poisonous. It is prohibited to utilize a Miswak from a poisonous tree. Our Holy Prophet (Peace Be upon Him)   Forbade the Usage of Raihaan as Miswak as it leads to the disease, Juz-zaam.

Miswaks from the following trees aren’t permissible:

Pomegranate; Bambo; Raihaan; Chambelie

Listed below are the kinds of Miswak recommended:

Peelo tree
Zaitoon or Olive tree
Bitam
Any bitter tree

Miswak of the Peelo Tree

“And, the finest of Miswaks is the Peelo, then the Olive.”
(KABIRI)

The ideal kind of Miswak is that which is obtained from the Peelo tree. The miswak of the Peelo tree is incredible for getting the sparkle or glitters of the teeth.  Our Holy Prophet (Peace Be upon Him) likewise lauded and endorsed the Peelo tree for Miswak usage. Apart from recommending the Peelo tree, Holy Prophet (Peace Be upon Him)   together with the Companion (May Allah be Pleased with them) utilized Miswaks of this tree.  Companions of Imam Shafi (R) have shown Agreement of Opinion among them on the point that the usage of the Peelo Miswak is Mustahab.

Miswak of the Olive Tree
Our Holy Prophet (Peace Be upon Him) has voiced highly of the Miswak of this tree as well. The following Hadith reveals the importance of the Olive tree Miswak:

“Use the Miswak of the Olive tree. It’s the Miswak of an auspicious tree. It cleans and makes wholesome the mouth. It erases the yellowishness of the teeth. It is my (i.e. Rasulullah’s)   Miswak and the Miswak of the Prophets who arrived before me.”
(MUNTAKHAB)

Miswak of the Bitam Tree
In another Hadith it’s stated that in the absence of the Peelo tree the Olive tree could be utilized, and in the absence of the Olive Miswak, the Bitam tree Miswak could be utilized.
(MUNTAKHAB)
Miswak of some bitter tree

If none of the three aforementioned kinds of Miswak is obtainable, a Miswak of any bitter tree can be taken.
(KUHASTANI)

” . . Afterwards it is recommended to utilize a Miswak of a sour tree since the Miswak of a sour tree takes off odor of the mouth to a greater extent.”
(KABIRI)



Twigs used

Spring blossoms of Kikar (also called Babool) in Hodal in Faridabad district of Harya

Teeth cleaning twigs can be obtained from a variety of tree species. Although many trees are used in the production of teeth cleaning twigs, some trees are better suited to clean and protect the teeth, due to the chemical composition of the plant parts.

The known tree species are:

Salvadora persica
Sassafras
Gumtree
Lime tree (Citrusaurantafolia)

330px-Neem_(Azadirachta_indica)_in_Hyderabad_W_IMG_6976

Neem (Azadirachta indica) in Hyderabad India

Orange tree (Citrussinensis)
African laburnum (Cassia sieberiana)
Tea Tree
Neem in Indian subcontinent
Vachellia nilotica, also called Babool or Kikar in Indian subcontinent
Dalbergia sissoo, also called Sheesham in Indian subcontinent
Liquorice
Gouania lupuloides
Cinnamon
Dogwood
Olive
Walnut
Acacia catechu
Acacia nilotica
and other trees with bitter rootWhen compared to toothbrushes, teeth cleaning twigs have several advantages:

  • More ecological in its life-cycle
  • Lower cost (0-16% of the cost of a toothbrush[12])
  • Independence from external supplier if made at home from privately owned trees
  • Low maintenance, with some twigs need moistening with water if they become dry, to ensure the end is soft. The end may be cut afresh to ensure hygiene, and should not be stored near a sink. The twig is replaced every few weeks to maintain proper hygiene.
  • No need for toothpaste

Miswak – A Student Designmiswak-toothbrush-1this-toothbrush

People in Middle East, Pakistan and India often prefer old-fashioned way to brush their teeth. They use Miswak, a stick made of Salvadora persica tree that cleans teeth even better than a toothbrush. Traditionally, you need to bite off the top of the stick, which exposes natural bristles that work similar to the toothbrush.

Leen Sadder, a design student at The School of Visual Arts decided to give the traditional Miswak stick a new modern look.  She called her natural toothbrush THIS and in order to promote the idea of this twig she decided to create a suitable package for it. Many people would not welcome the idea of biting the stick to clean their teeth. So the graduate student designed a cigar-cutter-like cap to make this job for you.

Keep in mind that THIS toothbrush is eco-friendly: natural and biodegradable and works just as well or even better than traditional toothbrush.

UPDATE dec 2015

http://www.thisisatoothbrush.com/contact/


from MY Plastic-Free Life

neem-chew-sticks-05A few points from India, where this method is still used, though not as widely as it was 30 years ago.

(1) Were the sticks really very dry? Here, we use young twigs off the plants because they are easiest to chew. they’re a bit more slender than what you seem to have there. Also because you don’t mention the taste, which should have been quite a notable thing had you had young, fresh sap in the twigs

(2) No, it’s not something used centuries ago. It’s in use in living memory, though — like I was saying, rarer than 30 years ago, when it seemed ubiquitous in my child’s eyes. Lots of long-lived people around here with all their teeth — can’t recall more than two of my 15-odd grandparents, great-grandparents and great-uncles and aunts having ever had caries of any sort (and no, dentist’s visits as prevention are STILL not the norm, so that’s not regular professional cleaning doing the trick).

(3) I’m guessing the pregnancy warning is statutory for any herbal product that hasn’t expressly been studied for safety in pregnancy. Neem does nothing terrible to your hormones that regular food doesn’t (there are enough phytoestrogens in food even without soy coming into the picture; there are other foods that cause migraines, relieve aches and whatnot… all food has ‘side effects’, if you look really hard for them). In India, or at least the eastern part of the country, we eat neem leaves all the time as a delicacy. No one stops using neem twigs or eating the leaves because they are pregnant. (And it’s not our of ignorance — there ARE proscribed foods, such as raw poppy seed paste.) We do stop when breastfeeding, but only because some children (supertasters, i guess) can taste the difference in mother’s milk.

(4) It shouldn’t take very long to brush with these — in fact, we try to peel the bark with the front teeth, then actively chew on the end to soften it and use alternate sides to do that, because the very act of chewing cleans the teeth for the most part. After that, a quick once-over. But yeah, nowhere near as fast as toothpaste… though like someone’s already said, the idea isn’t to do this at ‘brushing time’. We do it between tasks or while doing other stuff — on your morning walk, while walking the dog, reading the paper, watching an after-dinner movie, waiting for the bath to fill are all good ideas!


This Natural Alternative to Toothbrushes May Surprise You…

miswakThe kind of toothbrush we all have in our bathrooms was invented in 1938. Previously, from about 1498, boar bristles attached to bamboo or bone handles were used.

But what came before that? Answer: The miswak.

I have only been aware of the miswak for a year or so, and it took me this long to finally break down and buy one. Of all the areas in my life I’ve tried to switch to more traditional roots, an alternative to my toothbrush wasn’t a high priority. In fact I liked how my teeth cleaner worked.

And then, like everything else, I researched.

This natural stick, which is actually a length of root from the  Peelu tree, is a natural and more effective toothbrush than your typical plastic and nylon kind.

Beyond the miswak not being synthetic, which is enough reason for me to try it, it actually kills bacteria and fights plaque. On it’s own. With no toothpaste. This of course leads to fewer cavities and fresher breath.

What Does Science Say?

I admit I was skeptical. To hear of a natural toothbrush to not only replace my plastic one, but to not even need toothpaste (or floss?) – and then to learn that it kills bacteria and whitens teeth? Sounded too good to be true.

Then I came across this clinical study. The purpose of this study was to “compare the effect of the chewing stick (miswak), and toothbrushing on plaque removal and gingival health.” The results? “Compared to toothbrushing, the use of the miswak resulted in significant reductions in plaque.”

The study concluded the miswak is more effective than toothbrushing for reducing plaque and gingivitis.

Nothing holding me back, I marched right over to amazon where I bought a miswak.

Getting Started

It was fun when the package came and I asked my family (and friends) what this stick-looking thing actually was. They were all surprised it was a toothbrush. Just another thing to add to the list of what Lea does that is not normal!

You do have to use a peeler (or knife if you’re handy that way) to scrape off about 1/2 inch of the bark away. Then you chew on it until the fibers separate, and you can get right to work. At first some of the outer fibers will break off in your mouth – but then you’re pretty much all set.

The flavor is a natural one, and to describe it I would have to say it reminds me of horseradish on a much much milder level with no spice. And the more you use it, the more mild it gets.

Do I Like It?

When I first used my miswak I was afraid my teeth wouldn’t feel clean enough and I’d have to brush with toothpaste after. I was afraid I’d resort to using my plastic toothbrush at least before leaving the house…

I was wrong.

My teeth do actually feel cleaner. Even without my favorite toothpaste.

I always found a regular toothbrush to be ineffective at fully removing plaque, which is why I floss. However, using the miswak I was surprised to find I really didn’t need to floss anymore, since the properties of the miswak are so effective at removing the plaque.

My teeth are shinier. I almost think they are whiter…could it really be true?

The most pleasant surprise of all is how easy the miswak is to use. I can “brush my teeth” in the car on the way to…anywhere. I find the miswak to be handier than a regular toothbrush, probably due to the fact I don’t need to be near a sink to use it. In fact tonight I used it while playing Yahtzee with my daughter.

A few points from India, where this method is still used, though not as widely as it was 30 years ago.
(1) Were the sticks really very dry? Here, we use young twigs off the plants because they are easiest to chew. they’re a bit more slender than what you seem to have there. Also because you don’t mention the taste, which should have been quite a notable thing had you had young, fresh sap in the twigs
(2) No, it’s not something used centuries ago. It’s in use in living memory, though — like I was saying, rarer than 30 years ago, when it seemed ubiquitous in my child’s eyes. Lots of long-lived people around here with all their teeth — can’t recall more than two of my 15-odd grandparents, great-grandparents and great-uncles and aunts having ever had caries of any sort (and no, dentist’s visits as prevention are STILL not the norm, so that’s not regular professional cleaning doing the trick).
(3) I’m guessing the pregnancy warning is statutory for any herbal product that hasn’t expressly been studied for safety in pregnancy. Neem does nothing terrible to your hormones that regular food doesn’t (there are enough phytoestrogens in food even without soy coming into the picture; there are other foods that cause migraines, relieve aches and whatnot… all food has ‘side effects’, if you look really hard for them). In India, or at least the eastern part of the country, we eat neem leaves all the time as a delicacy. No one stops using neem twigs or eating the leaves because they are pregnant. (And it’s not our of ignorance — there ARE proscribed foods, such as raw poppy seed paste.) We do stop when breastfeeding, but only because some children (supertasters, i guess) can taste the difference in mother’s milk.
(4) It shouldn’t take very long to brush with these — in fact, we try to peel the bark with the front teeth, then actively chew on the end to soften it and use alternate sides to do that, because the very act of chewing cleans the teeth for the most part. After that, a quick once-over. But yeah, nowhere near as fast as toothpaste… though like someone’s already said, the idea isn’t to do this at ‘brushing time’. We do it between tasks or while doing other stuff — on your morning walk, while walking the dog, reading the paper, watching an after-dinner movie, waiting for the bath to fill are all good ideas!

Doug Simons Alternative to Dentists Yes!

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“Alternatives To Dentists” where Doug Simons will teach you:

dvd-buynow

  • How to truly clean your teeth
  • How to make your own tooth powder
  • How to seal over cavities
  • How to treat abscessed teeth
  • How to reverse gum disease
  • Information on root canals
  • Fluoride, is it good or bad?

http://alternativestodentists.com/testimonial/

The time Doug has spent in the wilderness gives him a unique perspective you don’€™t want to miss. Buy Doug’€™s DVD on ‘€œAlternatives to Dentists’€ by clicking on the BUY NOW button below.
‘€œDoug has a special gift to teach practical applications of how to use the plants  with gentle yet powerful results. ‘€
‘€œAbout 2 months after attending a weekend workshop with Doug Simons on herbal tooth care, a big chip broke off the back of one of my front teeth. My immediate response was ‘€œOh my God, I need to call the dentist,’€ but then I heard Doug’€™s wise voice in my mind say, ‘€œDon’€™t panic, you have time.’€

I went out and harvested a prickly pear pad and made a poultice just as Doug explained and placed it between my lip and gum at the broken tooth. I continued this for about 3 or 4 days. I also started taking about 1 1/2 teaspoons of Doug’€™s amazing wild, vibrant green horsetail each night before going to bed. It has been about 6 months now and just as Doug said it would, the enamal has completely grown over the borken area of the tooth and there has never been any sign of decay or pain.’€
Kathy Gould, Registered Herbalist, Meas AZ   www.SWHerbs.com

Mosi-guard

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I have been using Mosi-guard.  I like it very much.  Now to discover if it is THE repellent i have been looking for. WHAT am i looking for?  Safe in every way and stronger than DEET!

Australian Stockists – phone first, as this list is not up-to-date.

Insect bites in the UK (and OZ)— identify what has bitten you with this ultimate guide

Mosi-guard reviews


source:   http://www.mosi-guard.com/mosi-guard-ingredients/#citriodiol

mosiguard_main__34824.1383789874.1280.1280Mosi-guard Natural’s® ingredients

Full details of Mosi-guard Natural’s ingredients. This is important to people looking for a naturally and sustainably sourced insect repellent which is also a DEET free alternative to synthetic insect repellents.

Mosi-guard Natural® Spray ingredients

Mosi-guard Natural® spray is an oil and water based solution.

Main ingredients

  1. 30% Citriodiol® — The active ingredient comes from a botanical oil found in the leaves of the eucalyptus citriodora tree. This is responsible for the repellency of Mosi-guard Natural® products. The main component in Citriodiol is p-menthane-3,8-diol or PMD, making up at least 64% of the oil.
  2. Aqua — Water provides a liquid base for the product.
  3. Denatured ethanol and isopropyl alcohol — Forms of non-drinkable alcohol used as solvents to help blend the active ingredient (which is oily) into the product.

Mosi-guard Natural® Spray Extra ingredients

Mosi-guard Natural® Spray Extra is a hydroalcoholic solution. The main difference in the ingredients of Spray and Spray Extra is that the Spray Extra contains 40% Citriodiol® compared to 30% Citriodiol in the Spray.

Main ingredients

  1. 40% Citriodiol — The active ingredient comes from a botanical oil found in the leaves of the eucalyptus citriodora tree. This is responsible for the repellency of Mosi-guard Natural® products. The main component in Citriodiol is p-menthane-3,8-diol or PMD, making up at least 64% of the oil.
  2. Aqua — Water provides a liquid base for the product.
  3. Denatured ethanol and isopropyl alcohol — Forms of non-drinkable alcohol used as solvents to help blend the active ingredient (which is oily) into the product.

Mosi-guard Natural® Roll-on ingredients

Mosi-guard Natural® Roll-on is an emulsion. An emulsion is a mixture of two phases that will not mix together under normal circumstances, in this case oil and water. To prevent the two phases from separating we use stabilisers.

Main ingredients

  1. 30% Citriodiol® — The active ingredient comes from a botanical oil found in the leaves of the eucalyptus citriodora tree. This is responsible for the repellency of Mosi-guard Natural® products. The main component in Citriodiol is p-menthane-3,8-diol or PMD, making up at least 64% of the oil.
  2. Aqua — Water is used to provide a liquid base for the emulsion.Minor ingredients (≤ 10%)
  3. Isohexadecane — A clear, odourless, apolar oil with 99% purity. It has a light velvety skin feel and functions as an emollient. It provides a moisturising effect by limiting water loss from the skin.
  4. Diisopropyl Adipate — This is the ester formed by combining isopropyl alcohol and adipic acid. Adipic acid is found in beet juice. It acts as a lubricant on the skin’s surface and give it a soft and smooth appearance.
  5. Steareth-21 — A waxy solid derived from fatty alcohols. It is prepared from vegetable oils by hydrogenation. It emulsifies and disperses the oily materials into the water to form a stable emulsion.
  6. PEG-8 Distearate and Steareth-2 — Waxy solids used as co-emulsifiers for oil-in water emulsions. They work in combination with steareth-21 to form a glossy white lotion.
  7. Cetearyl Alcohol — A waxy solid derived from fatty alcohol. It acts as an emulsion stabiliser and prevents separation of the oils and water.
  8. Disodium EDTA — EDTA acts as an antioxidant. Without EDTA colours and odours can break down.
  9. Sodium Lactate Aqua — A natural salt formed from fermentation of lactic acid and dissolved in water. It improves the stability of the product by creating an undesirable environment for bacteria. The other benefit of sodium lactate is its high capacity for holding water. This will increase the moisture content of the skin.
  10. C18-22 Hydroxyalkyl Hydroxypropyl Guar — A thickener and emulsion stabiliser that improves the feel and texture of the product by increasing its thickness.
  11. Hydrogenated  Polydecene, Sodium Polyacryloyldimethyl Taurate and Trideceth-10 — These increase the thickness of the product and improve its feel and texture.
  12. Lactic Acid Aqua — Used to adjust the final pH of the product.

Mosi-guard Natural® Stick ingredients

Mosi-guard Natural® stick is a solid insect repellent formula.

Main ingredients

  1. 32% Citriodiol® — The active ingredient comes from a botanical oil found in the leaves of the eucalyptus citriodora tree. This is responsible for the repellency of Mosi-guard Natural® products. The main component in Citriodiol is p-menthane-3,8-diol or PMD, making up at least 64% of the oil.
  2. Butylene glycol — This solvent stops the active ingredient, Citriodiol, from crystallising. It also helps to keep the skin moist and prevents bacteria growth.
  3. Glycerine — A viscous (sugar alcohol) common in cosmetic products. It is derived from vegetable oils and is a by-product of soap manufacture. It is used to improve smoothness by providing lubrication and moisturising effects.Minor ingredients (≤ 10%)
  4. Sodium Stearate — A white solid that is the main component in soap. It thickens the product into the solid stick and works to improve its texture and feel.
  5. Cetyl Alcohol — A waxy solid that thickens the product. It acts an emollient and thickener to form the stick and prevents water loss from the stick.


source:    http://www.mosi-guard.com/about-mosi-guard/

 

Q & A

More about Mosi-guard Natural® in terms of how it is different from DEET based mosquito repellents as well as product information related to warning labels, animal testing and safety.

  1. Why is Mosi-guard Natural a unique insect repellent?
  2. What is DEET?
  3. DEET versus DEET free?
  4. What are the problems associated with DEET and how do they compare to Citriodiol?
  5. Is Mosi-guard Natural as effective as DEET based repellents?
  6. How can I be sure Mosi-guard Natural will work?
  7. Why do Mosi-guard Natural products have the irritating to eyes warning label?
  8. Why do Mosi-guard Natural products have flammable warning labels?
  9. Does Mosi-guard Natural contain allergens?
  10. Is Mosi-guard Natural safe for plants, animals and our planet?
  11. Some ingredients in Mosi-guard Natural® insect repellents sound very ‘chemically’ for products with a plant based active. Why is this?
  12. Are Mosi-guard Natural® insect repellents really naturally sourced?
  13. Why do Mosi-guard Natural® insect repellents contain alcohol?
  14. What is Citriodiol®?
  15. Can I use Mosi-guard Natural® if I am pregnant?
  16. How can I be sure Mosi-guard Natural will work?
  17. Can I use Mosi-guard Natural abroad?
  18. Can I use Mosi-guard Natural on babies and young children?
  19. How long does Mosi-guard Natural last as an effective insect repellent?
  20. What can I do to avoid these insect bites?

  21. What diseases does each insect spread and where are they found?
  22. Are there any insects and insect bites to worry about in the UK?
1. Why is Mosi-guard  Natural® a unique insect repellent?

You may think that a naturally and sustainably sourced insect repellent like Mosi-guard Natural® might not work. You may be concerned that naturally derived products may not be tested as thoroughly as more established, synthetic repellents. But Mosi-guard Natural® is one plant-based repellent that entomologists and regulators around the world agree is truly effective without raising the growing concerns about neurotoxicity and high dermal absorption seen in synthetic products such as DEET.

This active ingredient is sold under the brand name Citriodiol® and known generically as either PMD rich botanic oil (PMDRBO) or Oil of Lemon Eucalyptus (OLE). Citriodiol® is made from the sustainably produced essential oil from the eucalyptus citriodora tree. Unlike other essential oil based products, it has passed the most rigorous safety and efficacy tests. For example, it has met the highest standards obtaining unconditional registration at the following agencies

Citriodiol® is also currently being evaluated under the European Biocidal Products Regulation.

You may think that insect repellents are similar to moisturisers or face creams in terms of the tests they have to pass to be brought to market. In fact, the tests for insect repellents are much more comprehensive and strict. For example, insect repellents must pass comprehensive human health (and often environmental) risk assessments by the relevant authorities, neither of which are required for cosmetics.

So, if you are looking for a family-friendly insect repellent which not only works really well, but also supports the planet, Citriodiol® is for you. Look for the Citriodiol® logo on the back of many major brands of insect repellent or buy Mosi-guard Natural.

 2. What is DEET?

DEET is an old fashioned insect repellent which was registered for public use in 1957. It is derived from coal tar and is the most well known insect repellent. It is a synthetic chemical and powerful solvent.

 3. DEET versus DEET free?

The main difference is the active ingredient. The active ingredient in Mosi-guard Natural® is Citriodiol®. Unlike DEET which is a synthetic chemical active, Citriodiol is plant based, also known as Oil of Lemon Eucalyptus. Other differences relate to the problems associated with DEET.

In recent years, concerns have surfaced about the use of the insect repellent DEET. There have been a small number of serious neurotoxic effects reported in small children, as well as documented mosquito resistance and accumulation of DEET in some US public waterway. Many consumers also object to DEET’s strong, chemically smell and the fact that it melts plastic upon contact. This has prompted consumers to seek DEET free alternatives.

Mosi-guard Natural® products are all entirely DEET free. They don’t melt plastic, the contain and active that is biodegradable and there is no known accumulation in any public waterways. In addition, the most recent toxicity safety profile being reviewed by the European authorities show it is appropriate for use on children at 6 months and unlike any other naturally sourced active ingredient, the active in Mosi-guard Natural® has been recommended for use by the US Center for Disease Control to repel mosquitoes carrying insect borne disease.

 4. What are the problems associated with DEET and how do they compare to Citriodiol?

There are five main areas of concern about DEET. These concerns do not apply to Citriodiol which is the plant based active in Mosi-guard Natural®.

  1. A powerful solvent
    As a powerful solvent, DEET can damage plastics, paints and synthetic fabrics, causing permanent damage and it will make colours run. DEET should be kept away from climbing ropes, watches, compasses, cameras, fishing tackle and sports equipment.
  2. Rapidly absorbed
    DEET is rapidly absorbed through the skin. This can lead to problems especially in young children. As a result there are restrictions on children under the age of 12 using DEET and guidelines suggest you should only use DEET 1-2 times a day. In contrast, very little Mosi-guard Natural® is absorbed through the skin so children as young as 6 months can use Mosi-guard Natural® and there are no restrictions on how often it can be used.
  3. Resistance is developing
    There are now reports of mosquito resistance to DEET. They have never been seen to show any tolerance of Citriodiol products like Mosi-guard Natural®.
  4. Environmental concerns
    DEET is a synthetic chemical and powerful solvent that has been detected in relatively large quantities in major waterways. In contrast, Citriodiol, is deemed to be safe for plants and animals mainly because it is readily biodegradable. Also, Citriodiol does not introduce any new substances to the ecosystem.
  5. The DEET experience
    Many people find the oily feel and smell of DEET unpleasant and skin reactions are common.
 5. Is Mosi-guard Natural® as effective as DEET based repellents?

Yes. The active ingredient in Mosi-guard Natural® is Citriodiol®, nature’s most effective insect repellent. Our efficacy data shows that Citriodiol works just as well as DEET, giving 6-8 hours Complete Protection Time compared to 6-10 hours Complete Protection Time from DEET based repellents. And the Mosi-guard Natural® Spray Extra provides 10+ hours of protection. So Citriodiol in Mosi-guard Natural® is just as effective as DEET but without the associated problems  — it is a whole lot better for you and the environment.

 6. How can I be sure Mosi-guard Natural® will work?

More than 35 studies have been conducted on products like Mosi-guard Natural® that contain the active ingredient Citriodiol (also known as PMD rich botanic oil and PMDRBO). Each of these reflect a level of efficacy that far exceeds that of any other plant-based repellent and is in fact on par with synthetic repellents like DEET.

You can feel confident that this wealth of data translates to strong protection because it has been proven robust enough to support product approvals with some of the strictest authorities, including the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, as well as a recommendation by the US Center for Disease Control and Prevent (CDC), which reference it by its generic name in the US, Oil of Lemon Eucalyptus.

 7. Why do Mosi-guard Natural® products have the irritating to eyes warning label?

You will find the ‘irritating to eyes’ warning on all Mosi-guard Natural® products because Citriodiol, the active ingredient in Mosi-guard Natural®, stings when it gets in your eyes. There is sufficient quantity of Citriodiol in Mosi-guard Natural® products to have this stinging effect. Mosi-guard Natural® Spray and Mosi-guard Natural® Spray Extra also contain isopropyl alcohol which can irritate the eyes if sprayed directly to the eyes. According to EU directives which govern packaging and labelling, we meet the criteria for a category two eye irritant which requires us to display a hazard warning. Most products designed for use on the skin will irritate the eyes if applied directly on, or too close to the eyes. This warning simply alerts you to this fact.

 8. Why do the Mosi-guard Natural® Sprays have a flammable warning?

According to EU directives the Spray products are a category three flammable liquid which requires the flammable warning you see on Mosi-guard Natural® Spray and Mosi-guard Natural® Spray Extra. This means if these two products are directly ignited they can catch fire. You will find the ‘flammable’ warning on the Mosi-guard Natural® Spray and Spray Extra (and not on the Mosi-guard Natural® Stick or Roll-on) because the spray products contain flammable alcohol content in the same way that products like deodorant and hair spray do.

 9. Does Mosi-guard Natural® contain any allergens?

The allergens, citronellol (ca. 7%), linalool (<0.5%) and limonene (<0.5%) are all present in Eucalyptus Citriodora Oil, an ingredient found in Mosi-guard Natural®. Therefore, these allergens are also found in Mosi-guard Natural® and consumers with heightened sensitivity to these allergens should avoid using Mosi-guard Natural®.

 10. Is Mosi-guard Natural® safe for plants, animals and our planet?

Unlike synthetic substances which may upset the balance of our ecosystem by adding chemicals that mother nature never had in her plan, the active substance in Mosi-guard Natural® (Citriodiol®, also known as PMD rich botanic oil and PMDRBO) is derived from the Eucalyptus Citriodora tree. Use of our plant based mosquito repellent will not upset the earth’s natural balance.

Citriodiol is also biodegradable, which is important to the well-being of plants and animals. Instead of building up to potentially harmful high levels in waterways or soil, it simply breaks down over a relatively short period of time. This is in contrast to other repellents, like DEET, that have been recorded at noticeable levels in some public waterways. We also work hard to ensure Mosi-guard Natural® products are ethically and sustainably sourced.

We have never tested the effect of Mosi-guard Natural® on pets or any other animals. We would therefore recommend against using these products on animals.

11.  Some ingredients in Mosi-guard Natural® insect repellents sound very ‘chemically’ for products with a plant based active. Why is this?
Mosi-guard Natural® products combine the best of Mother Nature and the most suitable modern day formulatory tools to bring you a range of insect repellent products that are truly efficacious, skin kind, long lasting and suitable for your whole family. Here is more information about our ingredients.

12. Are Mosi-guard Natural® insect repellents really naturally sourced?
Mosi-guard Natural’s® active ingredient comes directly from lemon eucalyptus citriodora oil. This essential oil is sustainably harvested from the leaves and twigs of the eucalyptus citriodora tree by a simple process of steam distillation. In nature, the main component of the oil is citronellal and as the oil ages, that citronellal gradually turns into p-menthane-3,8-diol (PMD).
Some PMD is found in the “young” oil but only in small amounts. Because it is not possible to distill the oil when it is more mature and because the PMD is central to the oil efficacy in repelling biting insects, our suppliers harvest the oil from leaves that are about 18 months old. We then mimic nature by turning the rest of the citronellal into more PMD without adding anything extra to the finished product. This is how Mosi-guard Natural® insect repellents can come from a natural source but still work really well in repelling bugs.

13. Why do Mosi-guard Natural® insect repellents contain alcohol?
All Mosi-guard Natural® products contain types of non-drinkable alcohol that are routinely used in cosmetic products and that are approved for use in consumer products.  We can recommend them with confidence because each of our products has undergone rigorous reviews required for their sale around the world.
In case you still have concerns, here are the types of alcohol our products contain:
•    Mosi-guard Natural® Spray and Spray Extra contain ethanol and isopropyl alcohol which we use as solvents because the active ingredient is oily and won’t mix into a spray form with just water
•    Mosi-guard Natural® Roll-on contains cetearyl alcohol, a waxy solid, which we use as an emulsifier and emollient to improve the feel of the products on the skin and provide a moisturising effect
•    Mosi-guard Natural® Stick contains cetyl alcohol, used as an emulsifier and emollient and glycerine, a sugar alcohol used to improve smoothness through its lubrication and moisturising effects

14. What is Citriodiol®?
The active ingredient in Mosi-guard Natural® insect repellent is Citriodiol. Citriodiol is the trade name for p-menthane 3.8 diol botanic oil (PMDRBO) which can also be called PMD. In the USA Citriodiol is registered and known as oil of lemon eucalyptus (OLE).

15. Can I use Mosi-guard Natural® if I am pregnant?
There have been no formal studies on pregnant women. However, if you do need to use a repellent, Mosi-guard Natural® would be a logical choice as it is plant based and                   *very little is absorbed through the skin
* Editor’s note: not true – the skin absorbs most everything, if not everything you put on it

16. How can I be sure Mosi-guard Natural® will work?

More than 35 studies have been conducted on products like Mosi-guard Natural® that contain the active ingredient Citriodiol (also known as PMD rich botanic oil and PMDRBO). Each of these reflect a level of efficacy that far exceeds that of any other plant-based repellent and is in fact on par with synthetic repellents like DEET.

You can feel confident that this wealth of data translates to strong protection because it has been proven robust enough to support product approvals with some of the strictest authorities, including the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, as well as a recommendation by the US Center for Disease Control and Prevent (CDC), which reference it by its generic name in the US, Oil of Lemon Eucalyptus.

17. Can I use Mosi-guard Natural® abroad?

Mosi-guard Natural® is a regulated and proven plant based insect repellent with strong efficacy data that shows it is just as effective as synthetic insect repellents. Therefore, Mosi-guard Natural® can be used abroad.

18. Can I use Mosi-guard Natural® as an insect repellent for babies and children?

There has been extensive experience with the use of Mosi-guard Natural® as an insect repellent for babies from 6 months onwards. There is less experience with very young babies. Many people choose to use Mosi-guard Natural® insect repellent for babies and young children because very little of the active ingredient is absorbed through the skin. As baby’s skin can be sensitive, we always suggest that you apply a little of the repellent to a patch of skin before making a full application. It is essential to protect babies if taking them into areas where Malaria and other diseases may be a risk.

19. How long does Mosi-guard Natural® last as an effective insect repellent?

A study conducted at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine showed that Mosi-guard Natural® is effective for 11 hours against free-flying Mosquitoes when applied at normal consumer rates. In trials of this nature the subjects are inactive. Repellents may wear off more quickly if you are active or perspiring and should be reapplied more frequently.

20. What can I do to avoid these insect bites?

Always find out the most up-to-date information on insects and diseases for your travel destination. Websites like Know Before You Go and the Hospital for Tropical Diseases provide such useful information. GPs and travel clinics can also offer valuable advice about the most effective preventative medication for your destination.

However, it is important to note that no preventative medication offers 100% protection, so it is very important to avoid being bitten.

Mosquito bite prevention

Keep covered up
Most mosquitoes bite between dusk and dawn. Avoid exposing your skin by wearing long sleeved shirts and trousers. Aedes mosquitoes which transmit dengue and yellow fever are mainly active during the day with their peak biting times shortly after sunrise and just before sunset. To avoid being bitten by these daytime biters avoid outdoor shady conditions and sleep under a mosquito net if you take a siesta.

Use effective insect repellent
If your skin is exposed then it is important to use a safe and effective insect repellent on all areas of exposed skin.

Use a mosquito net at night
Mosquito nets provide very good protection especially when impregnated with the residual insecticide permethrin. Permethrin is poorly absorbed by the skin and has a low mammalian toxicity. There are a number of different styles of mosquito net and you should choose the one most suitable for where you are.

Air-conditioning
Sleeping in a room with air-conditioning will discourage mosquitoes.

Use a plug-in insecticide vaporiser
Use a knockdown spray (any fly spray will do) to clear the room of mosquitoes. Plug-in insecticide vaporisers are very effective for overnight protection as long as the room is relatively free from draughts. The vaporisers consist of a heating pad onto which an insecticide soaked tablet is placed. The insecticide gradually vaporises throughout the night killing any mosquitoes that get into the room.

Spray mosquito breeding grounds
If you are staying for long periods in areas where mosquitoes are a problem, then remember that they breed in stagnant water. Mosquitoes lay eggs in as little as a quarter inch of standing water. A good mosquito bite prevention method is to ensure mosquito breeding areas within 500 yards of your accommodation are regularly sprayed or eliminated.

Midge bite prevention

Midges are tiny swarming insects that are common in the Scottish Highlands during the summer months. Bites from midges do not transmit disease but can make life almost unbearable. Mosi-guard Natural® will help stop midges from biting but not from swarming around you. You can avoid midges with anti-midge hats, midge body suits and midge netting (smaller than mosquito nets) to cover tent entrances. Natural remedies include garlic, marmite, yeast tablets, sprigs of bog-myrtle or burning citronella.

Tick bite prevention

Tick bites spread lyme disease in the UK and abroad. There is currently no vaccine against lyme disease so you must be aware that areas with ground cover, foliage and diverse wildlife can pose a risk of ticks. To prevent tick bites use an insect repellent and keep covered up. Tucking your trouser legs into your socks will help. After being outside in tick prone areas be sure to check your body, pets and clothing for ticks. Carry a tick remover so you can quickly remove ticks and reduce the chance of disease transmission.



Source:    http://blog.cherrytreecountryclothing.com/deet-repellent-verses-mosi-guard-natural-insect-repellent/

Have you ever wondered what the benefits and disadvantages of using chemically based repellents are?  

Have you thought about Deet and perhaps compared it with a natural based insect repellent such as Mosi guard?

Listed below is a comprehensive list of the major benefits of using Mosi Guard natural insect repellent, compared to the chemical based Deet insect repellent.

Mosi-guard-natural-extra-sprayMosi-Guard Natural Insect Repellent

Mosi guard natural insect repellent is 100% natural and is made from renewable resources. The main ingredient is Citriodiol which is a lemon eucalyptus oil. Insects such as mosquitoes, sandflies, midges, ticks and leeches find this eucalyptus oil distasteful, resulting in confused and disorientated insects.

Mosi-guard natural insect repellent is recommended for adults, children and babies from 3 months of age and is suitable for both high risk and low risk geographical areas. It can be used for walking, hiking, treking, hunting, golfing, farming or fishing.  You can also use it when at the beach, relaxing in the garden, or cycling, climbing or camping.

Extensive research and tests have been carried out on insects in Tanzania, Malaysia, Bolivia – tests have even been conducted on the midges in Scotland, with positive results in every situation! Plus, the Mosi guard repellent is the only plant based repellent that is recognised as being effective by leading authorities.

Mosi guard is actively supporting the BADA-UK (Borreliosis and Associated Diseases Awareness – UK) charity in promoting public awareness of Lyme disease and protection against tick bites. For every Mosi guard sold within the UK, a donation to BADA is made. For further information, check out the BADA-UK website – www.bada-uk.org.

In summary, the 100% natural Mosi guard insect repellent will protect you against:

  • Mosquitoes
  • Sandflies
  • Ticks
  • Midges
  • Leeches

 Mosi guard Natural Insect Repellent – Benefits and Disadvantages

Benefits Disadvantages
  • 100% Natural Ingredients
  • Repels up to 10 hours
  • Suitable for adults, children and babies from 3 months old
  • Use in high and low risks geographical areas
  • Uses renewable resources therefore environmentally friendly
  • Protects against Mosquitoes, Sandflies, Midges, Ticks and Leeches
  • No adverse effects on clothing or plastic equipment
  • Fresh, lemon smell
  • Supports BADA- UK Charity
  • Tested in Tanzania, Malaysia, Bolivia, and even on midges in Scotland
  • Can be washed off easily
  • Kind to your skin
  • Can cause eye and mouth area to sting if applied incorrectly
  • Can feel slightly sticky/oily when applied initially
  • If pregnant, you are advised to consult a doctor before use

Deet Insect Repellent

Deet insect repellent is a chemical based repellent made from coal tar. First introduced and used in the late 1940’s by the US Army, Deet (or Diethyl Toluamide) is used in high risk environments where there is a high number of malaria – carrying mosquitoes.

There are three strengths of Deet available:

  • Deet 30% concentration – suitable for most holiday destinations
  • Deet 50% concentration – can be used by children and adults
  • Deet 100% concentration – should be used on clothing only

There has always been some concerns over using chemically based Deet insect repellent on our health and equipment. Testing revealed that Deet insect repellent should be kept away from climbing ropes, watches, compasses, cameras, rucksacks and any sports equipment as it has an adverse affect on plastic. Plus, Deet can also make colours run on fabric.

More recent studies (February 2013) carried out by London School of Hygiene and Tropial Medicine has shown that some mosquitoes are now growing resistant to Deet. For further information www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-21519998

Deet Insect Repellent – Benefits and Disadvantages

Benefits Disadvantage
  • Suitable for use in high risk geographical areas
  • Suitable for areas which are exposed to Malaria and dengue fever
  • Very little odour
  • Non-greasy
  • Protects against Mosquitoes, Ticks, Fleas and Chiggers, plus any other insect that can transmit diseases
  • May cause minor skin irritation
  • Chemical based
  • Chemicals can pass through your skin
  • Can damage climbing ropes, watches, compasses, and any sporting equipment as Deet will damage any plastic based equipment

World’s Best Eco Vegan Toothbrush! Eureka!

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man-cleaning-teeth-miswak-stick-jpg-653x0_q80_crop-smart

How is it that some people who have never used a toothbrush have also never had a cavity.  At last – after wondering and researching casually for over ten years, I have found it!



The World’s Best Eco Vegan Toothbrush!

and guess what! It’s a STICK!  cut from the roots of the licorice plant!

i have found the STICK!  my search is over!

my search ended at Shipards Herb FarmLicorice Book   and    Licorice Root
from Shipards Herb Farm: How To Order –  If know what you are after, you may order or check the availability and price of any plants by emailing us at info@herbs-to-use.com

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Improvement is noticeable within a week! using the sticks naturally improves mouth hygiene dramatically.

i have been using my licorice stick now for three days. And my  teeth have taken on opalescent or perhaps a porcelain quality – and the faint patchiness of this new whiteness emerging indicate that there is more tooth whitening to come.
whitening was the last thing I was thinking of when I thought I would give this stick a real tryout!

PS miswak inspired me to find something here in australia.  and o dear, dare i say it? i think my licorice-root stick is even better than the best miswak. it is softer than most sticks, but i will reserve opinion until i test a few different miswak sticks.

for a period of about 1 year, i have had one tiny area at the base of one tooth which was seemed always to have an infection .  the dentist discovered it, and named it as pyorrhoea and cleaned under the skin at the base of the tooth. and it was gone. yet six months later, the pyorrhoea returned.

during this three days of using my lovely  licorice-root toothbrush, the most wonderful toothbrush of all,  i now do not have the beginnings of gum disease  … yeehah

Read more from these Fans of the Stick
1 Nadia, another fan of the STICK 
Growing up on the Caribbean island of Trinidad, my Mother was given the twigs of the hibiscus tree to use as a toothbrush – they referred to this as datwan
2
another possible fan, a learner’s diary blogger
3 the most excellent site all about Miswak and teeth

STOP PRESS!  UPDATE! march 2017

dawn of a new era = fancy MISWAK toothbrush    SWAK from Germany

 


 

Using Miswak has made me want to smile a lot more. Miswak has made my teeth a lot whiter. I wish I had taken pictures of my teeth two months ago. If I had, you would see a stark contrast between what my teeth looked like before I started using Miswak, and what they look like now. My teeth still aren’t perfect, but if I keep using Miswak, they will be.

Using Miswak has made me want to smile a lot more. Miswak has made my teeth a lot whiter. I wish I had taken pictures of my teeth two months ago. If I had, you would see a stark contrast between what my teeth looked like before I started using Miswak, and what they look like now. My teeth still aren’t perfect, but if I keep using Miswak, they will be.

A little history ….
Indigenous people, who typically possess a mouthful of flawless teeth, use herbs, twigs and roots to clean their teeth. Even the skulls of cavemen depict a mouthful of nearly flawless teeth. Our ancestors were using something natural to clean their teeth. Perhaps, something such as licorice root which is also an antibacterial herb that reduces plaque and has anti-cavity functions.


i have found the STICK!  my search is over!

UPDATE june 2017
because i have found my perfect toothbrush, the licorice-root, this site is now archived, still maintained. the only difference is that there are no longer any “contact” or “feedback” page. you can still comment on posts and pages.

thank you for your interest in this site dear readers – it is very widely read, so thank you for reading!       Cheers from marion

 


Wooden Chew Sticks

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Buy Wooden Chew Sticks:   |  Ebay    |   Neem Picks


Thursday Plantation – The Original Australian Tea Tree Chewing Sticks (Toothpicks) Cinnamon Flavor – 100 Stick(s)

Buy from:  Amazon         LuckyVitamin
41E4DGFJJJL._SY355_Thursday Plantation The Original Australian Tea Tree Chewing Sticks (Toothpicks) deliver therapeutic grade Melaleuca alternifolia oil between teeth and at the gum line. Thursday Plantation The Original Australian Tea Tree Toothpicks help remove debris and plaque in placesThursday Plantation The Original Australian Tea Tree Chewing Stick (Toothpick) is infused with a powerful array of natural plant extracts, including peppermint, spearmint, cinnamon, fennel and menthol.

Thursday Plantation The Original Australian Tea Tree Chewing Sticks help reduce bad breath and support oral hygiene by eliminating odour causing bacteria that can lodge between teeth after eating.

Features and Benefits:

Contains 100% pure Tea Tree Oil, an antibacterial agent
Suitable for use to assist smoking cessation by keeping hands busy
Powerful, fresh flavor
Handy pocket-size pack

 Testimonials on Amazon:
If you are in the process of quitting smoking, BUY THESE. Chew on them in the car, outside with people on their smoke breaks, at the bar, etc. They taste so good and make your breath smell great, and toothpicks are so much classier than cigarettes! The cinnamon ones are veeeerrry strong, so if you aren’t a big cinnamon fan, stay away. The mint and tea tree are strong enough on their own.

I have tried a number of brands of Tea Tree Oil chewing sticks and these are the best! They are very strong, so it may take a little getting used to, but the mix of oils in these gives the best flavor and the wood they use is the highest quality.

Now, I always carry a pack with me. They are great for after meals or simply to freshen your breath throughout the day.
I’m not a person who smokes however these are very high quality chew sticks. Made of birch they don’t shred as easy for the avid chewer. Regular toothpicks are no longer the same to me because these def. raise the standard. I want to note that the taste of these picks is pretty strong especially for the non-smoker (like me) but I like these all the same.

Note that I’m cavity prone! However after chewing and picking my teeth with these 3 times a day, 2 weeks before i went to the dentist…my dentist informed me that I had the cleanest mouth he had ever seen. And no cavities.
Note that I have been Cold free for about 2 and a half years.
Note that I gave one of these to my friends at work who had a mouthsore and he claims it numbed the pain away.

Ever since I was introduced to Thursday Plantation – Tea Tree Toothpicks I carry them with me all the time. They keep my teeth clean after meals and they get rid of bad breath. There are other brands out there but don’t be fooled. Thursday Plantation – Tea Tree Toothpicks are the best on the market.

I was given this product by a client of mine whom I told I was planning on quitting smoking. I decided to have nicotine gum on standby because was a pretty heavy smoker (1pk/day). Well, hesitant to chew the gum and feed my body the drug I am trying to kick, I turned to these chewing sticks. Every slightest urge to smoke, I pop one of these bad boys in my mouth and suck and chew on it for 10 minutes. The minute it hits my mouth, I forget my cigarette craving. Plus, my breath smells great, and I always have that just went-to-the dentist clean mouth feeling. This is the easiest time I have ever had stopping smoking.

There are SO many imposters but they all fail to achieve the kick that these pics pack when you pop one in your mouth. And for the brave at heart, I suggest chewing on them after they get a little soft. The effect is sinus-clearing! I love thursday plantation chewing sticks and will accept no substitutes and believe me, I have tried them all.

Excellent product. The sticks are sturdy and the flavor is distinct but not overpowering. Great not only as a smoking cessation aid but as regular toothpicks.

Please note that when shipped as part of a larger order, the plastic containers can bounce around in the box and open, spilling the sticks all over. It’s best to order separately from large items, in which case they’ll ship in a padded envelope rather than a big box and won’t have this problem.

The very-easy-opening containers might also pose a problem for someone trying to carry them around in a pants pocket.

I quit smoking 6 months ago with chantix and these toothpicks. I quit the Chantix a couple months in but have been using the toothpicks ever since. Also have been getting nausea a lot lately. After looking into lots of different ideas, I googled tea tree oil…..every site warns you not to take internally. It can be highly toxic even in small doses. So while it did help quitting smoking, I’m switching over to the minty toothpicks you get in restaurants.


Auromere Ayurvedic Neem Picks 100 Toothpicks Case of 12
$_57

Buy from:   ebay.com

Ayurvedic toothpicks made from birchwood dipped in Neem Bark extract and other potent essential oils to stimulate the gums, remove food particles and plaque between teeth, and freshen the breath.

Pack Size : 100 Toothpicks
Unit Type : Case

Ingredients:
Birchwood toothpicks flavored with Neem Bark extract, Cassia (cinnamon) Oil, Menthol, Peppermint Oil, Spearmint Oil, and Fennel Oil.

 


A few points from India, where this method is still used, though not as widely as it was 30 years ago. (1) Were the sticks really very dry? Here, we use young twigs off the plants because they are easiest to chew. they’re a bit more slender than what you seem to have there. Also because you don’t mention the taste, which should have been quite a notable thing had you had young, fresh sap in the twigs (2) No, it’s not something used centuries ago. It’s in use in living memory, though — like I was saying, rarer than 30 years ago, when it seemed ubiquitous in my child’s eyes. Lots of long-lived people around here with all their teeth — can’t recall more than two of my 15-odd grandparents, great-grandparents and great-uncles and aunts having ever had caries of any sort (and no, dentist’s visits as prevention are STILL not the norm, so that’s not regular professional cleaning doing the trick). (3) I’m guessing the pregnancy warning is statutory for any herbal product that hasn’t expressly been studied for safety in pregnancy. Neem does nothing terrible to your hormones that regular food doesn’t (there are enough phytoestrogens in food even without soy coming into the picture; there are other foods that cause migraines, relieve aches and whatnot… all food has ‘side effects’, if you look really hard for them). In India, or at least the eastern part of the country, we eat neem leaves all the time as a delicacy. No one stops using neem twigs or eating the leaves because they are pregnant. (And it’s not our of ignorance — there ARE proscribed foods, such as raw poppy seed paste.) We do stop when breastfeeding, but only because some children (supertasters, i guess) can taste the difference in mother’s milk. (4) It shouldn’t take very long to brush with these — in fact, we try to peel the bark with the front teeth, then actively chew on the end to soften it and use alternate sides to do that, because the very act of chewing cleans the teeth for the most part. After that, a quick once-over. But yeah, nowhere near as fast as toothpaste… though like someone’s already said, the idea isn’t to do this at ‘brushing time’. We do it between tasks or while doing other stuff — on your morning walk, while walking the dog, reading the paper, watching an after-dinner movie, waiting for the bath to fill are all good ideas! – See more at: http://myplasticfreelife.com/2011/06/verdict-on-neem-chew-stick-toothbrushes/#sthash.THS1Dkh6.dpuf
A few points from India, where this method is still used, though not as widely as it was 30 years ago. (1) Were the sticks really very dry? Here, we use young twigs off the plants because they are easiest to chew. they’re a bit more slender than what you seem to have there. Also because you don’t mention the taste, which should have been quite a notable thing had you had young, fresh sap in the twigs (2) No, it’s not something used centuries ago. It’s in use in living memory, though — like I was saying, rarer than 30 years ago, when it seemed ubiquitous in my child’s eyes. Lots of long-lived people around here with all their teeth — can’t recall more than two of my 15-odd grandparents, great-grandparents and great-uncles and aunts having ever had caries of any sort (and no, dentist’s visits as prevention are STILL not the norm, so that’s not regular professional cleaning doing the trick). (3) I’m guessing the pregnancy warning is statutory for any herbal product that hasn’t expressly been studied for safety in pregnancy. Neem does nothing terrible to your hormones that regular food doesn’t (there are enough phytoestrogens in food even without soy coming into the picture; there are other foods that cause migraines, relieve aches and whatnot… all food has ‘side effects’, if you look really hard for them). In India, or at least the eastern part of the country, we eat neem leaves all the time as a delicacy. No one stops using neem twigs or eating the leaves because they are pregnant. (And it’s not our of ignorance — there ARE proscribed foods, such as raw poppy seed paste.) We do stop when breastfeeding, but only because some children (supertasters, i guess) can taste the difference in mother’s milk. (4) It shouldn’t take very long to brush with these — in fact, we try to peel the bark with the front teeth, then actively chew on the end to soften it and use alternate sides to do that, because the very act of chewing cleans the teeth for the most part. After that, a quick once-over. But yeah, nowhere near as fast as toothpaste… though like someone’s already said, the idea isn’t to do this at ‘brushing time’. We do it between tasks or while doing other stuff — on your morning walk, while walking the dog, reading the paper, watching an after-dinner movie, waiting for the bath to fill are all good ideas! – See more at: http://myplasticfreelife.com/2011/06/verdict-on-neem-chew-stick-toothbrushes/#sthash.THS1Dkh6.dpuf