Tag Archives: Gingivitus

Many Benefits of Using a Toothstick

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Many Benefits of Using a Toothstick

What Are the Benefits of Using a Toothstick?

Removes Bad Breath:

Bad breath is known as the condition of halitosis, is also eliminated if you use a toothstick for rubbing the teeth and gums. The refreshing and antibacterial property of Miswak helps you to get rid of the bad breath. Also, it increases the saliva production

Strengthen The Gums:

There are various gum diseases from which you may suffer if you don’t take proper care of the oral cavity. Disease like gingivitis (swelling and inflammation in the gums) is extremely painful. The gums are the only thing holding in your teeth. Use a toothstick instead of any other teeth cleaning method to strengthen your gums. Rub along the gums all over, back and front, especially where the teeth emerge from the gumline.

Protect Against Germs:

There are some bad bacterias or germs in the mouth which destroy the gums giving ways to various gum diseases. Using a toothstick regularly can help your teeth fight against those bad bacteria thereby, strengthening the gums.

Good To Treat Plaque:

Plaque is the colourless bacteria that forms on the teeth. Regular brushing removes the same however, a deposit of it causes ‘tartar’ which can worsen the teeth health and cause gum problems or teeth loss in future. Using a toothstick regularly helps in the removal of plaque due to its antibacterial properties.

PREVENTION  •   MAINTENANCE   •   REPAIR

• teeth whitening
• pigment removal
• killing off caries-associated bacteria
• bad breath neutralization
• polished teeth effect
• treatment and prevention of gum disease, canker sores and oral herpes
• balancing the pH in your mouth
• creates a fragrance in the mouth
• help in reversing tooth decay
• increases salivation and hence inhibits dry mouth (Xerostomia)
• rebuilding cracked tooth enamel
• natural remineralisation of tooth enamel
• caries and dental plaque reduction/prevention
• possibility to brush your teeth anywhere and in any situation
• living more sustainably and ecologically

why keep the stick on a PEG and
why NOT in an airtight container?

• bacteria will breed, creating mould, which also breaks down the fibres
• where is my stick? where did i leave it. have you seen my toothstick?
• if the stick is hanging on the wall next to your keys, you will remember to take it with you
• teeth cleaning is meant to be done when you are resting or relaxing or even laying down on the bed or floor. it is a pleasurable relaxing pastime. teeth cleaning is not meant to be done standing up, on the run or when you are in a locked room with people bashing on the door telling you to “hurry up! i want to use the bathroom!”

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Miswak

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Buy Miswak :  Natural Toothbrush  |   Amazon   |   Neem Tree Farm   |  Google   |   Miswakstick.com   |  The Islamic Bookstore  |  Ebay Facebook  |  Miswak Promo $2 instead of $20

Download:   Miswak: A cultural Heritage PDF

http://www.miswakstick.com/files/Miswak-Scientific-Benifits.pdf

Articles:  Results of Clinical Study – comparison of Miswak & Brushing      Natural Toothbrush Alternatives    Kill Periodontal symptoms at Home           Five Steps to Develop the Habit of Miswak

a wonderful article on discovering the joys of Miswak


From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

Traditional miswak sticks. Softened bristles on either end can be used to clean the teeth.

The miswak (miswaak, siwak, sewak, Arabic: سواك‎ or مسواك) is a teeth cleaning twig made from the Salvadora persica tree (known as arak in Arabic). A traditional and natural alternative to the modern toothbrush, it has a long, well-documented history and is reputed for its medicinal benefits. It is reputed to have been used over 7000 years ago. The miswak’s properties have been described thus: “Apart from their antibacterial activity which may help control the formation and activity of dental plaque, they can be used effectively as a natural toothbrush for teeth cleaning. Such sticks are effective, inexpensive, common, available, and contain many medical properties”. It also features prominently in Islamic hygienical jurisprudence.

The miswak is predominant in Muslim-inhabited areas. It is commonly used in the Arabian peninsula, the Horn of Africa, North Africa, parts of the Sahel, the Indian subcontinent, Central Asia and Southeast Asia. In Malaysia, miswak is known as Kayu Sugi (Malay for ‘chewing stick’).


WHAT TREES ARE MISWAK MADE FROM?

suitable wood for miswak come from various trees in different parts of the world for example:

Salvadora Persica (the toothbrush tree)    buy in oz   TOothbrush tree

source:   http://www.allthingsislam.com.au (this site is now closed)

Common Names: Salt bush, Mustard tree, The tooth brush tree.
Internationally known as: Arak, Siwak, Peelu, Miswak.
Scientific Name: Salvadora Persica

Potential Dental Benefits with Regular Use:

Research shows that the bark of the “Toothbrush Tree” contains on antibiotic which suppresses the growth of bacteria and the formation of plaque in the mouth. Research also suggests that the regular use of Miswak significantly reduces plaque, gingivitis, and the growth of cariogenic bacteria. No toothpaste required! Miswak, naturally contains many components such as fluoride, astringents, detergents, resins (a possible enamel protectant) and abrasives.

How to use:

Simply scrape off bark from the tip (1/2″), then chew the tip gently until brush like and the fiber becomes soft. Brush teeth horizontally and frequently. When the bristles are worn and the flavor has subsided, cut them off & repeat instruction.

Miswak is also spelled as Miswaak, Meswak, Miswaq or Meswaq. In Arabic, its also known as sewak. Some people prefer spelling it as sewak, siwak, siwaak and with such small variations.

 


Different Kind of Miswak … Peelu, Olive, Bitam Tree Miswak

source:  http://www.sewakalbadr.com/types-of-miswak.php

It is permissible to take for a Miswak all kinds of tree twigs provided these aren’t hazardous or poisonous. It is prohibited to utilize a Miswak from a poisonous tree. Our Holy Prophet (Peace Be upon Him)   Forbade the Usage of Raihaan as Miswak as it leads to the disease, Juz-zaam.

Miswaks from the following trees aren’t permissible:

Pomegranate; Bambo; Raihaan; Chambelie

Listed below are the kinds of Miswak recommended:

Peelo tree
Zaitoon or Olive tree
Bitam
Any bitter tree

Miswak of the Peelo Tree

“And, the finest of Miswaks is the Peelo, then the Olive.”
(KABIRI)

The ideal kind of Miswak is that which is obtained from the Peelo tree. The miswak of the Peelo tree is incredible for getting the sparkle or glitters of the teeth.  Our Holy Prophet (Peace Be upon Him) likewise lauded and endorsed the Peelo tree for Miswak usage. Apart from recommending the Peelo tree, Holy Prophet (Peace Be upon Him)   together with the Companion (May Allah be Pleased with them) utilized Miswaks of this tree.  Companions of Imam Shafi (R) have shown Agreement of Opinion among them on the point that the usage of the Peelo Miswak is Mustahab.

Miswak of the Olive Tree
Our Holy Prophet (Peace Be upon Him) has voiced highly of the Miswak of this tree as well. The following Hadith reveals the importance of the Olive tree Miswak:

“Use the Miswak of the Olive tree. It’s the Miswak of an auspicious tree. It cleans and makes wholesome the mouth. It erases the yellowishness of the teeth. It is my (i.e. Rasulullah’s)   Miswak and the Miswak of the Prophets who arrived before me.”
(MUNTAKHAB)

Miswak of the Bitam Tree
In another Hadith it’s stated that in the absence of the Peelo tree the Olive tree could be utilized, and in the absence of the Olive Miswak, the Bitam tree Miswak could be utilized.
(MUNTAKHAB)
Miswak of some bitter tree

If none of the three aforementioned kinds of Miswak is obtainable, a Miswak of any bitter tree can be taken.
(KUHASTANI)

” . . Afterwards it is recommended to utilize a Miswak of a sour tree since the Miswak of a sour tree takes off odor of the mouth to a greater extent.”
(KABIRI)



Twigs used

Spring blossoms of Kikar (also called Babool) in Hodal in Faridabad district of Harya

Teeth cleaning twigs can be obtained from a variety of tree species. Although many trees are used in the production of teeth cleaning twigs, some trees are better suited to clean and protect the teeth, due to the chemical composition of the plant parts.

The known tree species are:

Salvadora persica
Sassafras
Gumtree
Lime tree (Citrusaurantafolia)

330px-Neem_(Azadirachta_indica)_in_Hyderabad_W_IMG_6976

Neem (Azadirachta indica) in Hyderabad India

Orange tree (Citrussinensis)
African laburnum (Cassia sieberiana)
Tea Tree
Neem in Indian subcontinent
Vachellia nilotica, also called Babool or Kikar in Indian subcontinent
Dalbergia sissoo, also called Sheesham in Indian subcontinent
Liquorice
Gouania lupuloides
Cinnamon
Dogwood
Olive
Walnut
Acacia catechu
Acacia nilotica
and other trees with bitter rootWhen compared to toothbrushes, teeth cleaning twigs have several advantages:

  • More ecological in its life-cycle
  • Lower cost (0-16% of the cost of a toothbrush[12])
  • Independence from external supplier if made at home from privately owned trees
  • Low maintenance, with some twigs need moistening with water if they become dry, to ensure the end is soft. The end may be cut afresh to ensure hygiene, and should not be stored near a sink. The twig is replaced every few weeks to maintain proper hygiene.
  • No need for toothpaste

Miswak – A Student Designmiswak-toothbrush-1this-toothbrush

People in Middle East, Pakistan and India often prefer old-fashioned way to brush their teeth. They use Miswak, a stick made of Salvadora persica tree that cleans teeth even better than a toothbrush. Traditionally, you need to bite off the top of the stick, which exposes natural bristles that work similar to the toothbrush.

Leen Sadder, a design student at The School of Visual Arts decided to give the traditional Miswak stick a new modern look.  She called her natural toothbrush THIS and in order to promote the idea of this twig she decided to create a suitable package for it. Many people would not welcome the idea of biting the stick to clean their teeth. So the graduate student designed a cigar-cutter-like cap to make this job for you.

Keep in mind that THIS toothbrush is eco-friendly: natural and biodegradable and works just as well or even better than traditional toothbrush.

UPDATE dec 2015

http://www.thisisatoothbrush.com/contact/


from MY Plastic-Free Life

neem-chew-sticks-05A few points from India, where this method is still used, though not as widely as it was 30 years ago.

(1) Were the sticks really very dry? Here, we use young twigs off the plants because they are easiest to chew. they’re a bit more slender than what you seem to have there. Also because you don’t mention the taste, which should have been quite a notable thing had you had young, fresh sap in the twigs

(2) No, it’s not something used centuries ago. It’s in use in living memory, though — like I was saying, rarer than 30 years ago, when it seemed ubiquitous in my child’s eyes. Lots of long-lived people around here with all their teeth — can’t recall more than two of my 15-odd grandparents, great-grandparents and great-uncles and aunts having ever had caries of any sort (and no, dentist’s visits as prevention are STILL not the norm, so that’s not regular professional cleaning doing the trick).

(3) I’m guessing the pregnancy warning is statutory for any herbal product that hasn’t expressly been studied for safety in pregnancy. Neem does nothing terrible to your hormones that regular food doesn’t (there are enough phytoestrogens in food even without soy coming into the picture; there are other foods that cause migraines, relieve aches and whatnot… all food has ‘side effects’, if you look really hard for them). In India, or at least the eastern part of the country, we eat neem leaves all the time as a delicacy. No one stops using neem twigs or eating the leaves because they are pregnant. (And it’s not our of ignorance — there ARE proscribed foods, such as raw poppy seed paste.) We do stop when breastfeeding, but only because some children (supertasters, i guess) can taste the difference in mother’s milk.

(4) It shouldn’t take very long to brush with these — in fact, we try to peel the bark with the front teeth, then actively chew on the end to soften it and use alternate sides to do that, because the very act of chewing cleans the teeth for the most part. After that, a quick once-over. But yeah, nowhere near as fast as toothpaste… though like someone’s already said, the idea isn’t to do this at ‘brushing time’. We do it between tasks or while doing other stuff — on your morning walk, while walking the dog, reading the paper, watching an after-dinner movie, waiting for the bath to fill are all good ideas!


This Natural Alternative to Toothbrushes May Surprise You…

miswakThe kind of toothbrush we all have in our bathrooms was invented in 1938. Previously, from about 1498, boar bristles attached to bamboo or bone handles were used.

But what came before that? Answer: The miswak.

I have only been aware of the miswak for a year or so, and it took me this long to finally break down and buy one. Of all the areas in my life I’ve tried to switch to more traditional roots, an alternative to my toothbrush wasn’t a high priority. In fact I liked how my teeth cleaner worked.

And then, like everything else, I researched.

This natural stick, which is actually a length of root from the  Peelu tree, is a natural and more effective toothbrush than your typical plastic and nylon kind.

Beyond the miswak not being synthetic, which is enough reason for me to try it, it actually kills bacteria and fights plaque. On it’s own. With no toothpaste. This of course leads to fewer cavities and fresher breath.

What Does Science Say?

I admit I was skeptical. To hear of a natural toothbrush to not only replace my plastic one, but to not even need toothpaste (or floss?) – and then to learn that it kills bacteria and whitens teeth? Sounded too good to be true.

Then I came across this clinical study. The purpose of this study was to “compare the effect of the chewing stick (miswak), and toothbrushing on plaque removal and gingival health.” The results? “Compared to toothbrushing, the use of the miswak resulted in significant reductions in plaque.”

The study concluded the miswak is more effective than toothbrushing for reducing plaque and gingivitis.

Nothing holding me back, I marched right over to amazon where I bought a miswak.

Getting Started

It was fun when the package came and I asked my family (and friends) what this stick-looking thing actually was. They were all surprised it was a toothbrush. Just another thing to add to the list of what Lea does that is not normal!

You do have to use a peeler (or knife if you’re handy that way) to scrape off about 1/2 inch of the bark away. Then you chew on it until the fibers separate, and you can get right to work. At first some of the outer fibers will break off in your mouth – but then you’re pretty much all set.

The flavor is a natural one, and to describe it I would have to say it reminds me of horseradish on a much much milder level with no spice. And the more you use it, the more mild it gets.

Do I Like It?

When I first used my miswak I was afraid my teeth wouldn’t feel clean enough and I’d have to brush with toothpaste after. I was afraid I’d resort to using my plastic toothbrush at least before leaving the house…

I was wrong.

My teeth do actually feel cleaner. Even without my favorite toothpaste.

I always found a regular toothbrush to be ineffective at fully removing plaque, which is why I floss. However, using the miswak I was surprised to find I really didn’t need to floss anymore, since the properties of the miswak are so effective at removing the plaque.

My teeth are shinier. I almost think they are whiter…could it really be true?

The most pleasant surprise of all is how easy the miswak is to use. I can “brush my teeth” in the car on the way to…anywhere. I find the miswak to be handier than a regular toothbrush, probably due to the fact I don’t need to be near a sink to use it. In fact tonight I used it while playing Yahtzee with my daughter.

A few points from India, where this method is still used, though not as widely as it was 30 years ago.
(1) Were the sticks really very dry? Here, we use young twigs off the plants because they are easiest to chew. they’re a bit more slender than what you seem to have there. Also because you don’t mention the taste, which should have been quite a notable thing had you had young, fresh sap in the twigs
(2) No, it’s not something used centuries ago. It’s in use in living memory, though — like I was saying, rarer than 30 years ago, when it seemed ubiquitous in my child’s eyes. Lots of long-lived people around here with all their teeth — can’t recall more than two of my 15-odd grandparents, great-grandparents and great-uncles and aunts having ever had caries of any sort (and no, dentist’s visits as prevention are STILL not the norm, so that’s not regular professional cleaning doing the trick).
(3) I’m guessing the pregnancy warning is statutory for any herbal product that hasn’t expressly been studied for safety in pregnancy. Neem does nothing terrible to your hormones that regular food doesn’t (there are enough phytoestrogens in food even without soy coming into the picture; there are other foods that cause migraines, relieve aches and whatnot… all food has ‘side effects’, if you look really hard for them). In India, or at least the eastern part of the country, we eat neem leaves all the time as a delicacy. No one stops using neem twigs or eating the leaves because they are pregnant. (And it’s not our of ignorance — there ARE proscribed foods, such as raw poppy seed paste.) We do stop when breastfeeding, but only because some children (supertasters, i guess) can taste the difference in mother’s milk.
(4) It shouldn’t take very long to brush with these — in fact, we try to peel the bark with the front teeth, then actively chew on the end to soften it and use alternate sides to do that, because the very act of chewing cleans the teeth for the most part. After that, a quick once-over. But yeah, nowhere near as fast as toothpaste… though like someone’s already said, the idea isn’t to do this at ‘brushing time’. We do it between tasks or while doing other stuff — on your morning walk, while walking the dog, reading the paper, watching an after-dinner movie, waiting for the bath to fill are all good ideas!

World’s Best Eco Vegan Toothbrush! Eureka!

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World’s Best Eco Vegan Toothbrush! Eureka!

man-cleaning-teeth-miswak-stick-jpg-653x0_q80_crop-smart

How is it that some people who have never used a toothbrush have also never had a cavity.  At last – after wondering and researching casually for over ten years, I have found it!

Why the Stick? and Buy the Stick!

image source

The World’s Best Eco Vegan Toothbrush!

and guess what! It’s a STICK!  cut from the roots of the licorice plant!    see all about Licorice

i have found the STICK!  my search is over!

my search ended at Shipards Herb FarmLicorice Book   and    Licorice Root
from Shipards Herb Farm: How To Order –  If know what you are after, you may order or check the availability and price of any plants by emailing us at info@herbs-to-use.com

imageimageimage

rkhwn7w

Improvement is noticeable within a week! using the sticks naturally improves mouth hygiene dramatically.

i have been using my licorice stick now for three days. And my  teeth have taken on opalescent or perhaps a porcelain quality – and the faint patchiness of this new whiteness emerging indicate that there is more tooth whitening to come.
whitening was the last thing I was thinking of when I thought I would give this stick a real tryout!

PS miswak inspired me to find something here in australia.  and o dear, dare i say it? i think my licorice-root stick is even better than the best miswak. it is softer than most sticks, but i will reserve opinion until i test a few different miswak sticks.

for a period of about 1 year, i have had one tiny area at the base of one tooth which was seemed always to have an infection .  the dentist discovered it, and named it as pyorrhoea and cleaned under the skin at the base of the tooth. and it was gone. yet six months later, the pyorrhoea returned.

during this three days of using my lovely  licorice-root toothbrush, the most wonderful toothbrush of all,  i now do not have the beginnings of gum disease  … yeehah

Read more from these Fans of the Stick
1 Nadia, another fan of the STICK 
Growing up on the Caribbean island of Trinidad, my Mother was given the twigs of the hibiscus tree to use as a toothbrush – they referred to this as datwan
2
another possible fan, a learner’s diary blogger
3 the most excellent site all about Miswak and teeth

STOP PRESS!  UPDATE! march 2017

dawn of a new era = fancy MISWAK toothbrush    SWAK from Germany

 


 

Using Miswak has made me want to smile a lot more. Miswak has made my teeth a lot whiter. I wish I had taken pictures of my teeth two months ago. If I had, you would see a stark contrast between what my teeth looked like before I started using Miswak, and what they look like now. My teeth still aren’t perfect, but if I keep using Miswak, they will be.

Using Miswak has made me want to smile a lot more. Miswak has made my teeth a lot whiter. I wish I had taken pictures of my teeth two months ago. If I had, you would see a stark contrast between what my teeth looked like before I started using Miswak, and what they look like now. My teeth still aren’t perfect, but if I keep using Miswak, they will be.

A little history ….
Indigenous people, who typically possess a mouthful of flawless teeth, use herbs, twigs and roots to clean their teeth. Even the skulls of cavemen depict a mouthful of nearly flawless teeth. Our ancestors were using something natural to clean their teeth. Perhaps, something such as licorice root which is also an antibacterial herb that reduces plaque and has anti-cavity functions.


i have found the STICK!  my search is over!

UPDATE june 2017
because i have found my perfect toothbrush, the licorice-root, this site is now archived, still maintained. the only difference is that there are no longer any “contact” or “feedback” page. you can still comment on posts and pages.

thank you for your interest in this site dear readers – it is very widely read, so thank you for reading!       Cheers from marion

 


Pyorrhea & Gingivitus & Periodontitis

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Notes: 

1/  not yet complete, still updating and clarifying

2/  Wikipedia is redirecting searches for “Pyorrhea” to “Periodontitis”.


Pyorrhea (Pus in Gums)

Source:       http://home-cure.net/home-remedy-pyorrhea-pus-gums/

Pyorrhea is a very common periodontal disease that affects gums surrounding the roots of the teeth. It leads to inflammation, irritation and pus in gums further resulting in loosening of teeth. Pyorrhea is the primary cause for tooth loss in adults.
Causes of Pyorrhea:

Pyorrhea is caused by bacterial infection.

Home cure for pyorrhea

Food particles get stuck in crevices between teeth.  When teeth are not brushed properly and regularly, bacteria build up on teeth plaque. Bacteria convert these food particles especially the sugar into acids. These acidic elements putrefy the gums and teeth and induce Pyorrhea like conditions.

Other common causes of Pyorrhea include external injury of teeth and gums, improper use of toothpick and incorrect brushing.

Symptoms of Pyorrhea:

Pus oozing from margins of teeth
Swollen and inflamed gums
Loosened teeth roots.
Sepsis of digestive tract or liver disorders, if pus persists for a longer time.


Pyorrhea (Pus in Gums) cont.

Ayurvedic Cure for Pyorrhoea (Pus in Gums)
Source:    http://home-cure.net/ayurvedic-cure-pyorrhoea/
Ayurveda Pyorrhoea cureIn ayurveda, pyorrehoea is called as Dantvesha or Putidanta. Pyorrehoea is charecterized by excessive discharges of pus from the roots of gums and teeth. If not cured in the initial stages, this can lead to various diseases. This happens because the patient swallows the pus along with the food and the consumed pus then gets absorbed into the gastro-intestinal system.

CAUSES AND SYMPTOMS AS PER AYURVEDA
The common symptoms of pyorrhoea are as follows

Teeth become loose and start falling one after another
Gum paining and bleeding
Difficulty in chewing solid food ingredients
Foul smell in mouth

The causes of pyorrhea are

Constipation
Indigestion
Unhygienic oral habits.

AYURVEDIC MEDICINES AND PRESCRIPTIONS
For constipation, triphala powder or decoction of it is very useful and must be taken regularly.
The powders of the barks Bakula and Babula are very good and are used as tooth powders.
Dasana Samskara Churna is the most commonly prescribed medicine for pyorrhoea. This is also used as a tooth powder.
Also the gums should be rubbed with Bhadramustadi Gutika.

HOME REMEDIES
The twig of Neem tree of Banyan tree should be used for brushing.
Hot water mixed with borax should be used for gargling mouth.

DIET AND OTHER REGIMEN
Fruits which are high in Vitamin C should be taken more.
Vegetables like bitter gourd, potato and drumstick are useful.
The things which stick to the roots of teeth should be avoided as far as possible.


 

Gingivitus & Periodontitis

Wikipedia: Gingivitis is a category of periodontal disease where there is no loss of bone but there is presence of inflammation and bleeding.

Wikipedia:  Periodontitis /ˌpɛrioʊdɒnˈtaɪtɪs/ or pyorrhea /ˌpaɪəˈriə/ is a set of inflammatory diseases affecting the periodontium, i.e., the tissues that surround and support the teeth. Periodontitis involves progressive loss of the alveolar bone around the teeth, and if left untreated, can lead to the loosening and subsequent loss of teeth. Periodontitis is caused by microorganisms that adhere to and grow on the tooth’s surfaces, along with an over-aggressive immune response against these microorganisms. A diagnosis of periodontitis is established by inspecting the soft gum tissues around the teeth with a probe (i.e., a clinical examination) and by evaluating the patient’s X-ray films (i.e. a radiographic examination), to determine the amount of bone loss around the teeth.[1] Specialists in the treatment of periodontitis are periodontists; their field is known as “periodontology” or “periodontics”.

Apparently, Gingivitus always precedes Periodontitis


 

 Gingivitus – how to never get it and how to get rid of it

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gingivitus beginning

Gingivitis-before-and-after-3

gingivitus before and after treatment

I helped my body rid my tooth of Gingivitus with a quality wooden tooth stick and hydrogen peroxide.

Get a dropper bottle, fill it with hydrogen peroxide.  Use your quality wooden toothpick to gently lift the skin at the bottom of affected tooth and drop 1 drop of hydrogen peroxide into the the affected area.

Go for a swim in the sea.

And within half an hour, your tooth is on the mend. Keep applying even when you think it is healed.

When you think it is healed, do the following twice a day – once on rising and before retiring for the evening.


ARTICLES of Interest – Links

at a quick glance, the following page looks like a good readperidontal advanced

http://www.healthyandnaturalworld.com/how-to-treat-gum-infection-naturally/

http://www.healingteethnaturally.com/home-remedies-for-curing-dental-abscess.html

i have not read any of the below – do  not know if useful

Source:       http://shelbourneclinic.ie/advice/gum-disease/

Source:       http://www.periodontalassociates.com.au/patient-information/periodontal-disease/about-periodontal-disease/

Source:       http://www.adelaide.edu.au/arcpoh/dperu/cpep/info/class.html

Source:

 

Source: http://northsidefamilydental.com.au/preventive/gingivitis/

Gum disease affects most people at some time during their life. It is usually caused by a build-up of plaque on teeth. One of the common signs of gum disease is bleeding gums. Different stages of gum disease are gingivitis and periodontitis. Gum disease is usually caused by plaque, a sticky film of bacteria that constantly forms on teeth. If plaque is not removed with thorough daily brushing and cleaning between teeth, gums become irritated and inflamed. The irritated gum tissue can separate from the teeth and form spaces called pockets. Destructive bacteria move into the pockets where they continue to promote irritation. Left untreated, the process can continue until the bone and other tooth-supporting tissues are destroyed. Periodontal disease progresses as the sulcus (pocket or space) between the tooth and gums gets filled with bacteria, plaque, and tartar, causing irritation to the surrounding tissues.  When these irritants remain in the pocket space, they can cause damage to the gums and eventually, the bone that supports the teeth. Gum disease is the leading cause of tooth loss in adults.

The different stages of gum disease:

Gingivitis

Gingivitis is early gum disease and occurs when dental plaque builds up on teeth, particularly where the gum joins the tooth. The signs of gingivitis are bleeding, redness and swelling of the gum. Gingivitis usually precedes periodontitis.
In the early stage of gingivitis, bacteria in plaque build up, causing the gums to become inflamed and to easily bleed during tooth brushing. Although the gums may be irritated, the teeth are still firmly planted in their sockets. No irreversible bone or other tissue damage has occurred at this stage. When gingivitis is left untreated, it can advance to periodontitis. In a person with periodontitis, the inner layer of the gum and bone pull away from the teeth and form pockets. These small spaces between teeth and gums collect debris and can become infected.

Periodontitis


Periodontitis is an advanced gum disease that may occur if gingivitis is not treated. The gum margin – the part of the gum that seals to the tooth, – is weakened and spaces form between the tooth and the gum. These spaces are called ‘periodontal pockets.’ Bacteria and their products become trapped in these pockets causing further inflammation (redness and swelling). Signs of periodontitis include bleeding, swelling and receding gums together with bad breath, a bad taste in the mouth and loose teeth.
Toxins or poisons — produced by the bacteria in plaque as well as the body’s “good” enzymes involved in fighting infections — start to break down the bone and connective tissue that hold teeth in place. As the disease progresses, the pockets deepen and more gum tissue and bone are destroyed. When this happens, teeth are no longer anchored in place, they become loose, and tooth loss occurs.

Gingivitis and Periodontics Treatment:
Treatment methods depend upon the type and severity of the disease. If the disease is caught in the early stages of gingivitis, and no damage has been done, one to two regular cleanings will be performed. You will also be given instructions on improving your daily oral hygiene habits and having regular dental cleanings.
If the disease has progressed to more advanced stages, a special periodontal cleaning called scaling and root planing will be performed.  It is usually done one quadrant of the mouth at a time while the area is numb.  In this procedure, tartar, plaque, and toxins are removed from above and below the gum line (scaling) and rough spots on root surfaces are made smooth (planing).  This procedure helps gum tissue to heal and pockets to shrink. If the pockets do not heal after scaling and root planning, periodontal surgery may be needed to reduce pocket depths, making the teeth easier to clean.


 

the link below is a business, the title of the page hooked me in, and at first glance, curing mentions Coconut Oil and Oregano oil (oregano vulgare), which is sound good sense – read the article, and be a jolly good reader and give some feedback on the article in the comment below.

http://www.destroydiseases.com/Gum_Disease.html


 

Periodontal Pockets

 

Published on May 16, 2013

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Bleeding Gums are a sign of gingivitis and periodontitis. It starts with bad oral bacteria causing plaque and tartar in the mouth. The tartar buildup causes gum pockets to form, which leads to bacterial infection in those gum pockets.

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Bleeding gums can be a result of gum disease as previously mentioned, but it can also be a symptom accompanying canker sores or mouth ulcers which have their own causes aside from gum disease. If bleeding occurs due to a sore in the mouth you will likely notice that the gums are sore, and these can come as single sores or in multiples. Signs that may indicate gum disease or gingivitis may include the following:

Sore gums
Swollen gums
Changes in the way teeth fit together
Formation of deep pockets between the teeth and gums
Gums that bleed during and after brushing teeth
Loose, or shifting teeth
Receding gums

There is much more to consider than just the pain or discomfort associated with the bleeding itself. It can often lead to gum disease. If there is a passageway for blood to exit your tissue, it makes sense that there would be a way for other things to enter the bloodstream. If this is the case, harmful bacteria that are formed in the mouth can gain access to your bloodstream and potentially cause a whole host of health problems. Some of the dangers that can eventually take place are:

Digestive system disorders
Respiratory problems
Higher risk for heart attack or stroke
Diabetes
Pancreatic cancer

The Major Cause of Bleeding Gums – Harmful Bacteria

Bacteria in the mouth can easily grow out of control, especially when proper oral hygiene is not being practiced, or the wrong oral care products are being used. When this happens, the bacteria form plaque, and eventually tartar. This will cause inflammation of the gums, along with swelling and bleeding. Bleeding can also occur as a result of improper flossing. Be careful to allow the floss to slide along the natural curves of the teeth, and do not force it.

Even when brushing and flossing regularly, you may be using products that are causing more harm than good. Commercial toothpastes and mouthwash are filled with potentially harmful ingredients.
Treating Bleeding Gums

We’ve previously discussed how bleeding gums can be related to gum disease, or other natural functions of the body. Here are a few ways to help treat, or control it if you’re suffering:

Establish a good oral hygiene program
Replace your commercial toothpaste and mouthwash with 100% pure oral products.
Eat a well balanced diet
Drink plenty of water
Do not use tobacco products
Be cautious about extremely hot or cold foods and beverages
Relax